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skullsmasher

Derek Boogaard-A brain going bad

22 posts in this topic

as sad as the story of Boogaard is, fighting does not need to be taken out of the nhl until fighting isn't a sport in itself

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UFC and boxing focus strictly on fighting and shots to the head. Why is a 30 second fight in a game considered to be more deadly than the career paths in those respective sports?

It's been a staple of this game ever since the first puck was dropped. With the decrease of illegal hits and new advances in equipment, players are safer today than they have been in the past. Granted that all goes out the window during a fight, but I just think there would be far more cases popping up if fighting was that bad for the game.

I'm falling asleep so this argument might not be overly strong.

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UFC and boxing focus strictly on fighting and shots to the head. Why is a 30 second fight in a game considered to be more deadly than the career paths in those respective sports?

It's been a staple of this game ever since the first puck was dropped. With the decrease of illegal hits and new advances in equipment, players are safer today than they have been in the past. Granted that all goes out the window during a fight, but I just think there would be far more cases popping up if fighting was that bad for the game.

I'm falling asleep so this argument might not be overly strong.

because in those sports, they dont fall onto solid ice

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There is no proof that fighting is the cause of the depression. It could easily be the pain killers or drugs that many of the enforcers take in order to play each night. There are a lot of non-enforcers who have taken their life during or following their career. It would also be interesting to see how many others have C.T.E in the regular world.

Edited by Jas0nMacIsaac

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There is no proof that fighting is the cause of the depression. It could easily be the pain killers or drugs that many of the enforcers take in order to play each night. There are a lot of non-enforcers who have taken their life during or following their career. It would also be interesting to see how many others have C.T.E in the regular world.

According to the article, one of the symptoms of CTE is addiction, which is evident in Boogaard's case. So yes it was the painkillers, but the addiction to painkillers was because of the repeated hits to his head.

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UFC and boxing focus strictly on fighting and shots to the head. Why is a 30 second fight in a game considered to be more deadly than the career paths in those respective sports?It's been a staple of this game ever since the first puck was dropped. With the decrease of illegal hits and new advances in equipment, players are safer today than they have been in the past. Granted that all goes out the window during a fight, but I just think there would be far more cases popping up if fighting was that bad for the game.I'm falling asleep so this argument might not be overly strong.

UFC fighters and professional Boxers fight once, twice or at most 3 times year and don't have to do it night after night and we didn't even talk yet about the differences of receiving a punch from a non covered hand and a covered one (boxing gloves, or UFC style gloves)

Edited by SS-SS

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UFC fighters and professional Boxers fight once, twice or at most 3 times year and don't have to do it night after night and we didn't even talk yet about the differences of receiving a punch from a non covered hand and a covered one (boxing gloves, or UFC style gloves)

ok and a boxer/fighter receives A LOTTT more hits and pounding all at once than a hockey player does

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ok and a boxer/fighter receives A LOTTT more hits and pounding all at once than a hockey player does

I agree, but then you get a 6 month to heal your injuries and you are surrounded by gsfighting sports doctors and professional unlike the hockey player who is surrounded by doctors who are mainly there for the type of injuries that are typical to the game.

Something like 6 months to heal a concussion is much better than taking drugs and jump back on the ice the second day to receive punches again.

Edited by SS-SS

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According to the article, one of the symptoms of CTE is addiction, which is evident in Boogaard's case. So yes it was the painkillers, but the addiction to painkillers was because of the repeated hits to his head.

That just seems like a easy way to pin the person's faults on fighting. There are no hard facts in that article, they say CTE is believed to be caused by trauma. At some point people are going to have to realize there are risk to playing sports just as there are risks to joining the military. Players are heavily compensated so I don't think it's our job to tell them what they should and shouldn't do.

Edited by Jas0nMacIsaac

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That just seems like a easy way to pin the person's faults on fighting. There are no hard facts in that article, they say CTE is believed to be caused by trauma. At some point people are going to have to realize there are risk to playing sports just as there are risks to joining the military. Players are heavily compensated so I don't think it's our job to tell them what they should and shouldn't do.

Well I guess neither of us really know since we don't know what percentage of people diagnosed with CTE had some sort of drug addiction, but for this stuff to withstand enough scrutiny to be published in peer-reviewed scientific journals I'm giving the doctors and researchers the benefit of the doubt until I come across a reason to change my mind.

As for banning fighting, maybe we shouldn't be telling them what they should and shouldn't do, but at least with this research we are learning more about the risks of being a fighter. Just like people are more informed now about the risks of smoking...ultimately people are left to decide for themselves if they're going to do it, but at least now that we are more aware of the life-threatening risks involved, people can make a more educated decision.

At least fighting isn't necessary for most hockey players so if the risk of CTE scares people away from fighting, they won't have to completely give up the sport.

Edited by devilsfan26

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Well I guess neither of us really know since we don't know what percentage of people diagnosed with CTE had some sort of drug addiction, but for this stuff to withstand enough scrutiny to be published in peer-reviewed scientific journals I'm giving the doctors and researchers the benefit of the doubt until I come across a reason to change my mind.

As for banning fighting, maybe we shouldn't be telling them what they should and shouldn't do, but at least with this research we are learning more about the risks of being a fighter. Just like people are more informed now about the risks of smoking...ultimately people are left to decide for themselves if they're going to do it, but at least now that we are more aware of the life-threatening risks involved, people can make a more educated decision.

At least fighting isn't necessary for most hockey players so if the risk of CTE scares people away from fighting, they won't have to completely give up the sport.

Good post and I agree, people may be less likely to fight if they are educated with the certain risk but still give them the option. I feel society is trying too hard to implement policies and regulations to keep us safe. When will it stop? When all conflict of any sort is illegal?

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Fight is OK in hockey, and even safer than in boxing! Wearing padded gloves actually makes it more likely the person getting hit will suffer injuries!

So I see no problem with fighting at all the way it is currently in the game.

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Fight is OK in hockey, and even safer than in boxing! Wearing padded gloves actually makes it more likely the person getting hit will suffer injuries!

So I see no problem with fighting at all the way it is currently in the game.

The padded gloves allows the head to suffer multiple traumas without being knocked out or knocked down.

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I loved when Jim McKenzie said he was so bummed when a guy's helmet came off in a fight because bare knuckles hurt so much more hitting bare skull... the helmet at least provided some padding for his hands.

Fingers and hands break quicker than skulls -- and hurt like hell! Skulls - the pain isn't as easily recognized because the body gives you time to get the hell out of a MAJOR situation without having to cringe in pain first.

Hockey is an insane sport when you think about it. Lots of people say get rid of the protective equipment and football will become a safer game.

Hockey... you're protecting yourself from that stupid biscuit! Such an awesome sport for being so stupid...

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Well they should at least break up fights when the helmets fall off, there were 3 fights in last nights game and 5/6 players involved had the helmets on all fight.

http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/45648690/ns/sports-nhl/

But when we are talking about people dying way before they should and developing dementia at a young age, we fans can't just say it's more entertaining when people's lives are at stake. Watching a fight from the stands you can't tell what the hell is going on except that you see punches that look like they are connecting, and eventually another player falls down. The energy is still there, and keeping the helmet on means the safety is there too.

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