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Beezer34

Autism..

7 posts in this topic

Is it really an increase or just "better" detection of? Also at what spectrum are the kids being diagnosed at? I am almost certain that the increase is in the higher functioning group, whom may have been missed years ago.

If you look at anyone closely enough you can find something to diagnose them with :blink:

Edited by Dead

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I'm with Dead on this one. My sister can even diagnose herself with mild autism. I think any mildly anti-social behavior even mere lack of picking up on social queues can be classified as autism by some accepted interpretations.

Still one cannot deny that real autism really does seem to have been on the upswing over the last 50 years. I'm hard pressed to assume it's just better reporting and more widespread understanding.

Oh I know ... it's the vaccines... :argh::argh::argh:

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Is it really an increase or just "better" detection of? Also at what spectrum are the kids being diagnosed at? I am almost certain that the increase is in the higher functioning group, whom may have been missed years ago.

If you look at anyone closely enough you can find something to diagnose them with :blink:

I too think this is the most likely reason.

Back in the day they just used to group these kids as having mental retardation but these days experts can accurately diagnose each child better.

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I don't know how you can argue anything more than over-diagnosis. In an NY Times article, kids that exhibit shyness can be diagnosed as autistic. Or a kid has A.D.D. because he can't sit through an entire reading of Hamlet.

I remember reading something that says in some authoritative manual that psychiatrist's use (sounds vague I know, but too lazy to look up) that if you still feel grief over a deceased loved one for more than two months, then you likely are biologically disposed to clinical depression. I wish that these self-designated "experts" would just listen to what they are saying every once in a while. If they did, maybe they would then say to themselves, "how on earth can I possibly make such a conclusion," and they can pursue more productive efforts such as staring at a blank wall.

ADDENDUM: This sums up what I'm trying to say much more eloquently.

Edited by Daniel

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I'm with Dead on this one. My sister can even diagnose herself with mild autism. I think any mildly anti-social behavior even mere lack of picking up on social queues can be classified as autism by some accepted interpretations.

Truth. I'd hate to think of what I'd have been "diagnosed" with if I was 20-30 years younger.

Still one cannot deny that real autism really does seem to have been on the upswing over the last 50 years. I'm hard pressed to assume it's just better reporting and more widespread understanding.

Probably.

Oh I know ... it's the vaccines... :argh::argh::argh:

I don't want to start a sh!tstorm over this, but... I don't think that camp was wholly wrong. The vaccine thing may have been overblown, but they did make some really good points. For one thing, we do need to be careful about the cocktails of drugs we're pumping into our kids at such a young age. Also, they may have been on to something when they pointed to the mercury used as a preservative (IIRC) in some of those vaccines as a possible culprit. Didn't they at least succeed in getting mercury taken out (which should probably be considered a good thing)?

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I'm a teacher, and we're seeing the reasons/effects of the diagnosis a lot. First of all, the number of students with disabilities has skyrocketed in our school. Some of it is certainly more diagnoses. Because there is now a law that kids with disabilities are put into the least restrictive environment, there's less of a stigma. Kids with Asperger's, or other types of high functioning autism spectrum conditions, are put into normal classes, sometimes with a couple of aids. They can get normal diplomas, go onto college, and apply for the same jobs as everybody else. This is great, since high functioning kids need some help coping/adjusting, but should be able to function just fine in the real world. the lack of stigma and legal protection allows parents/kids to seek the help they need without fearing they'll be limited for trying. An unfortunate side effect is some parents are seeking diagnoses to get extended time on SATs and other major tests. Because most people can be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (during a training session, most of the staff left diagnosing themselves with mild autism), and schools give out test modifications like candy, parents can cheat the system pretty easily, which blows for any number of reasons, not the least of which is it diverts resources from the kids who actually need help.

That said, there also seem to be more cases. I've heard theories that it's environmental as well as any number of crazier ideas. The most important thing is society as a whole is learning how to deal with autism and how to acknowledge that there is a wide range of symptoms, conditions, and outcomes, and we are getting better at helping individuals, especially kids, succeed, even if it isn't easy. This data can't hurt that cause.

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