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Prucenterrules

Hockey players are the worlds toughest athletes

23 posts in this topic

As we all know hockey players never get respect from people. We all watch a ton of NHL games and we take for granted the sacrifices these players make. Here is an article about Ian Laperriere and the day he blocked a shot with his eye vs the Devils in game 5 of 2010. Ignore the flyers portion of the article.

On blocking the shot

For a guy that didn’t wear a shield, that was always my biggest fear of losing an eye. My first thought was, ‘Again? Are you f****** kidding me?’ I blocked shots like that my entire career, over 1,000 times.”

“When I talked to Jimmy [Jim McCrossin, Flyers Athletic Trainer/Strength and Conditioning coach] on the ice, I was worried if my eyeball was there. It took 5-10 minutes for my vision to come back.”

“It was the scariest thing in my career.”

It was Thursday, April 22, 2010, with 16:09 left in the third period of Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Playoffs between New Jersey and Philadelphia. Devils defenseman Paul Martin unleashed a slap shot from the point that struck Flyers forward Ian Laperriere in the eye.

An on-ice scene not for the faint of heart followed.

The force of the puck caused severe nerve damage in Laperriere’s right eye, and the impact shattered his orbital bone. The shot also caused a bruise and bleeding in the front of his brain.

“The CAT scan showed my skull wasn’t broken but there was bruising,” Laperriere said. “I’m glad it did. If I would have gone back and got hit, I would have died on the ice.”

http://thehockeyguys.net/philadelphia-flyers-ian-laperriere/

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As we all know hockey players never get respect from people. We all watch a ton of NHL games and we take for granted the sacrifices these players make. Here is an article about Ian Laperriere and the day he blocked a shot with his eye vs the Devils in game 5 of 2010. Ignore the flyers portion of the article.

On blocking the shot

http://thehockeyguys.net/philadelphia-flyers-ian-laperriere/

It's sickening that he was allowed to come back and play. Laperriere is lucky he did not die. Hockey players are tough. Football players are tough. But the culture needs to change where these guys are forced to come back days or weeks after a concussion, and many times, the same game. It's absolutely stupid. I'm not going to sit back and be amazed by this. Scott Stevens returned after missing a few periods after being struck in the side of the head by a Pavel Kubina slapshot. His return was considered heroic here, yet it cost him his career. Paul Kariya missed a period after he went unconscious from a Scott Stevens hit. He also heroically returned -- this time in the same game. That was part of the reason why he retired years before he should have.

No one should have to be showing the youngsters how tough they are by returning after suffering concussions. If Sidney Crosby sat out like he should of after that David Steckel hit, he doesn't suffer a second concussion in a matter of days after taking a Victor Hedman hit. He doesn't put a Hall of Fame career in jeopardy at 23. I remember a few years ago Big Ben Roethlisberger sat out one important game due to a concussion and was called out by many members of his team, who said they had played the next week, or next series, and even the next snap after a concussion. Well there is a reason there are thousands of ex-NFLers suing the league. There is a reason these guys here ringing in their ears still, or are losing their memories in the 30s. Because they were tough and did what teammates and coaches expected them to do. And look where they are now.

Edited by devilsrule33
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It's sickening that he was allowed to come back and play. Laperriere is lucky he did not die. Hockey players are tough. Football players are tough. But the culture needs to change where these guys are forced to come back days or weeks after a concussion, and many times, the same game. It's absolutely stupid.

It's terrible that coaches and doctors let them play. I wasn't stating that coming back from this is admirable. What I was emphasizing is the fact that these players just throw their bodies in front of 80-100mph shots without even second guessing it. Blocking a shot for the good of the team and to help out your teammates, that is admirable.

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For reference, I did a study last year on gloves and found that anything past 60 mph will shatter your bones with padding. Without padding, you don't stand a chance in hockey, so luck and facing the puck the proper way is the only way these guys survive agame nevermind the season. I'm amazed the rags were able to ice a team for the full playoffs with their dumb collapse and block system.

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Funny!! No where, anywhere did I see the word "dumbest" They must not be watching the games. :whistling:

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If Sidney Crosby sat out like he should of after that David Steckel hit, he doesn't suffer a second concussion in a matter of days after taking a Victor Hedman hit. He doesn't put a Hall of Fame career in jeopardy at 23.

Agreed, it's been a culture of "play for now" that sports has been trying to battle to change. There's a balance between being safe and being overly cautious in a contact sport.

Crosby clearly was concussed, but was also misdiagnosed which is why he was out for as long as he was without recovery... It took over a year to diagnose him with a broken neck, likely from the Hedman hit.

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Penguins+stick+their+necks+with+Sidney+Crosby+misdiagnosis/6073446/story.html

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Not for nothing, but Ian Laperriere is a really, really nice guys as well. I've met him a few times at the Flyer's pre-season camp and he couldn't have been nicer to me or my kids. Autographing pucks for them when they didn't have pens or pucks, for example. Hope he gets to stick around hockey as a coach or something now that he's retired.

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For reference, I did a study last year on gloves and found that anything past 60 mph will shatter your bones with padding. Without padding, you don't stand a chance in hockey, so luck and facing the puck the proper way is the only way these guys survive agame nevermind the season. I'm amazed the rags were able to ice a team for the full playoffs with their dumb collapse and block system.

Were you the guy who was working with the Rangers on new equipment ideas?

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Were you the guy who was working with the Rangers on new equipment ideas?

Yea that's me.

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For reference, I did a study last year on gloves and found that anything past 60 mph will shatter your bones with padding. Without padding, you don't stand a chance in hockey, so luck and facing the puck the proper way is the only way these guys survive agame nevermind the season. I'm amazed the rags were able to ice a team for the full playoffs with their dumb collapse and block system.

Are you sure about that? I have definitely taken shots to the gloves over 60 mph and was fine.

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it really depends on the way the puck travels, if you took it square on, you would be fine, if you take it on its edge, we broke all the samples we had. a matter of pressure and impact area. callahan was the main reason for the study, he broke his middle metacarpal with a shot he blocked.

also, whether the puck was travelling directly at you or if it deflected off obviously plays a role on the amount of energy transferred.

Edited by ZeroGravityFat

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Just to clarify, are you talking about the puck hitting the outside of the glove, the part with the most padding? I feel like something is missing here. I think there would be a lot more injuries if a puck traveling at just 60 mph would shatter people's hands. I'll probably be getting new gloves soon, what gloves were you using in this study so I know what not to buy? :P

Edited by devilsfan26

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It's sickening that he was allowed to come back and play. Laperriere is lucky he did not die. Hockey players are tough. Football players are tough. But the culture needs to change where these guys are forced to come back days or weeks after a concussion, and many times, the same game. It's absolutely stupid. I'm not going to sit back and be amazed by this. Scott Stevens returned after missing a few periods after being struck in the side of the head by a Pavel Kubina slapshot. His return was considered heroic here, yet it cost him his career. Paul Kariya missed a period after he went unconscious from a Scott Stevens hit. He also heroically returned -- this time in the same game. That was part of the reason why he retired years before he should have.

No one should have to be showing the youngsters how tough they are by returning after suffering concussions. If Sidney Crosby sat out like he should of after that David Steckel hit, he doesn't suffer a second concussion in a matter of days after taking a Victor Hedman hit. He doesn't put a Hall of Fame career in jeopardy at 23. I remember a few years ago Big Ben Roethlisberger sat out one important game due to a concussion and was called out by many members of his team, who said they had played the next week, or next series, and even the next snap after a concussion. Well there is a reason there are thousands of ex-NFLers suing the league. There is a reason these guys here ringing in their ears still, or are losing their memories in the 30s. Because they were tough and did what teammates and coaches expected them to do. And look where they are now.

Wonderful post...

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Just to clarify, are you talking about the puck hitting the outside of the glove, the part with the most padding? I feel like something is missing here. I think there would be a lot more injuries if a puck traveling at just 60 mph would shatter people's hands. I'll probably be getting new gloves soon, what gloves were you using in this study so I know what not to buy? :P

Well you would have to be very unlucky to block a shot at that angle from the assumed distance to create the correct forward trajectory to create the force required and not skim, but yes with glove on, the pressure is high enough on itsleading edge to compress the material enough to essentially render the glove none existent as far as your hand is concerned.

As for the brands, they all use the same type of foam do makes no diff, I tested all of them.

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Well you would have to be very unlucky to block a shot at that angle from the assumed distance to create the correct forward trajectory to create the force required and not skim, but yes with glove on, the pressure is high enough on itsleading edge to compress the material enough to essentially render the glove none existent as far as your hand is concerned.

As for the brands, they all use the same type of foam do makes no diff, I tested all of them.

So you're saying it's possible but very unlikely for that to happen? I can see that being the case. I thought you were saying a 60 mph shot would definitely break your hand.

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It's sickening that he was allowed to come back and play. Laperriere is lucky he did not die. Hockey players are tough. Football players are tough. But the culture needs to change where these guys are forced to come back days or weeks after a concussion, and many times, the same game. It's absolutely stupid. I'm not going to sit back and be amazed by this. Scott Stevens returned after missing a few periods after being struck in the side of the head by a Pavel Kubina slapshot. His return was considered heroic here, yet it cost him his career. Paul Kariya missed a period after he went unconscious from a Scott Stevens hit. He also heroically returned -- this time in the same game. That was part of the reason why he retired years before he should have.

No one should have to be showing the youngsters how tough they are by returning after suffering concussions. If Sidney Crosby sat out like he should of after that David Steckel hit, he doesn't suffer a second concussion in a matter of days after taking a Victor Hedman hit. He doesn't put a Hall of Fame career in jeopardy at 23. I remember a few years ago Big Ben Roethlisberger sat out one important game due to a concussion and was called out by many members of his team, who said they had played the next week, or next series, and even the next snap after a concussion. Well there is a reason there are thousands of ex-NFLers suing the league. There is a reason these guys here ringing in their ears still, or are losing their memories in the 30s. Because they were tough and did what teammates and coaches expected them to do. And look where they are now.

Totally agree, and there are so many perfect examples, extremes even Junior Seau, young lives wasted heros why because they sacrificed there lives. That's not a hero to me. Let's be proud of these players alive and in good health not because how many times they have been almost killed or are living a life of pain after the sport.

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So you're saying it's possible but very unlikely for that to happen? I can see that being the case. I thought you were saying a 60 mph shot would definitely break your hand.

Yea, it has a lot of variables that have to come together.

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^$(^@$

OK - last post -- seriously...

I just want to put this out there. I don't disagree with the fact these guys have to protect themselves more. But I HATE the way these guys are portrayed. Everyone acts like these guys are victim or morons or that they are martyring themselves for their sport. It's not that way - for the most part it's just not. I think they just lose track of where to draw the line.

Just so it's out there -- and you guys who play should understand what I mean I think. IT FEELS GOOD. At the outset it feels fvcking awesome. If you guys dont understand that :noclue: you kind of don't quite understand what your talking about. What you're preaching about. You MUST take this first CRITICAL FACT into account if you are going to actually change anything. I mean you can make rules - but it's wussing it down. You take away the strength of the nature of the desire to push on.

This stuff - dealing with pain builds from what feels like a healthy place. As a former ballet dancer (as in washed up by 12) you enjoy the discipline, not unlike going for the burn. It adds a little extra layer of satisfaction - yeah maybe its stupid and maybe it's a little like "why do you bang your head against the wall? Because it feels so good when I stop" kind of thing.

It feels really good to push through things. There is a rush a physical mental and emotional climax when you push through physically. BUT -- clearly things get off track and you lose sight of why you're pushing, when it stops feeling good, when you see there will be no payoff - you can't see why you're playing when you are truly hurt. It's a little pavlovian -- it's a compulsion. If you give in and sit, and your team fails it's your fault. If they succeed then you feel exposed as a fraud - lacking true value. It's irrational. There is no rule that can change those feelings. It's not something pounded into guys - YES a lot of stuff is indeed pounded in by coaches -- but they are playing upon this INNATE human trait - this fear and self-doubt. They are turning a man's strength against him. Telling a guy that strength, stamina is NOT manly or that being manly isn't important... that's just bullsh!t. It changes nothing. His strength IS important, and it's being exploited.

So we can all tutt tutt and say this has to stop hurumph hurumh hurumph. Yeah -- that's real easy to post on a message board. But it's not the full story and it doesn't ring true when you say crap like it's more manly to sit. and you will not get buy in from the players is the really bottom line. I just think people have to admit what they are really dealing with. It's just not that easy.

You CAN do your best to get rid out of the careless, malicious headshots people throw. You can make it as weak and unappealing as it is. Re-brand. I have no problem with that. But trying to stop a guy from playing hurt by preaching at him... that's just insulting. Trainers coaches GMs yeah - they need to be held accountable for exploiting human nature - this characteristic a hockey player is going to have. But there is something irritating in the way the message is being delivered - it raises the hackles of dudes who's hackles dont need much to get raised.

blah blah blah .. I wish I didn't care or feel like I had to say something. I don't want to post here... but this sh!t just sits in my head and no one gives a fvck in the real world :evil: I just would rather be thinking about something that's me... that's organic to MYSELF. I dont play hockey... I'm not going to. why does it matter that I put this garbage out here -- I'm TIRED!!! dammitdammitdammit. haha - it's painful and I keep pushing through for no reason :lol: no reason at all... **sigh** it is to laugh.... -_- i need a hobby :P

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It feels really good to push through things. There is a rush a physical mental and emotional climax when you push through physically. BUT -- clearly things get off track and you lose sight of why you're pushing, when it stops feeling good, when you see there will be no payoff - you can't see why you're playing when you are truly hurt. It's a little pavlovian -- it's a compulsion. If you give in and sit, and your team fails it's your fault. If they succeed then you feel exposed as a fraud - lacking true value. It's irrational. There is no rule that can change those feelings. It's not something pounded into guys - YES a lot of stuff is indeed pounded in by coaches -- but they are playing upon this INNATE human trait - this fear and self-doubt. They are turning a man's strength against him. Telling a guy that strength, stamina is NOT manly or that being manly isn't important... that's just bullsh!t. It changes nothing. His strength IS important, and it's being exploited.

This.........is.....in all honesty one of the most brilliant things I've ever read on these boards. Hands down. Well written and well said.

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So you're saying it's possible but very unlikely for that to happen? I can see that being the case. I thought you were saying a 60 mph shot would definitely break your hand.

EDIT. I can't read.

Edited by lucifer91

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I think you mis read his original post. He said 60 mph, without padding.

For reference, I did a study last year on gloves and found that anything past 60 mph will shatter your bones with padding. Without padding, you don't stand a chance in hockey, so luck and facing the puck the proper way is the only way these guys survive agame nevermind the season. I'm amazed the rags were able to ice a team for the full playoffs with their dumb collapse and block system.

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Sh!t, i misread....sorry dude. I should have went back and double checked.

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