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Backup Goaltender for Next Season - SCOTT CLEMMENSEN signed

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http://www.nhl.com/ice/news.htm?id=723441&navid=nhl:topheads

Posted this in another thread, BUT I'd love for Lou to take a chance on this guy.  He hasn't been able to put together a good season since playing on the Predators, but I think he's been very much victimized by the teams he's played behind.  He got manhandled in Tampa due to that teams abysmal defense through the majority of this past season.  However he played okay in front of Nashville, a defense first team.  So I'd love to see him in a Devils jersey for a season to see how he does.  Who knows, maybe he'll have a great season behind Cory and then we have an actual asset to trade. 

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didnt Marty have an under 900 save % in the AHL?

some goalies make the jump to the NHL and run with it regardless of their performance down in the minors

 

I personally would rather have a veteran as a backup but we'll see

Edited by The 29th Pick

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didnt Marty have an under 900 save % in the AHL?

some goalies make the jump to the NHL and run with it regardless of their performane down in the minors

 

I personally would rather have a veteran as a backup but we'll see

 

4.03 GAA and an .884 save% in 32 GP in '92-'93.  Game was different then, and that Utica team gave up a lot of goals (354 in 80 games). 

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didnt Marty have an under 900 save % in the AHL?

some goalies make the jump to the NHL and run with it regardless of their performane down in the minors

 

I personally would rather have a veteran as a backup but we'll see

 

Name me one other goalie that did this.  Yeah, a goalie's best NHL years will trump his best AHL years, almost always.  But there aren't many guys who manage this - most are really good in the AHL or in European pro leagues and become good in the NHL.

Edited by Triumph

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I'd rather pass on Lindback. He was a fine back up his 2 years in Nashville (.914 SV%) but his play has really fallen off in Tampa (.897 SV%). He faced almost the same shots against per 60 on both teams too.
 

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I'd rather pass on Lindback. He was a fine back up his 2 years in Nashville (.914 SV%) but his play has really fallen off in Tampa (.897 SV%). He faced almost the same shots against per 60 on both teams too.

 

 

I'd be inclined to agree however, unless you're Marc Denis, our system tends to help goalies.

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I'd pass on Lindback. I've never seem such a big goalie play so small and his positioning is terrible. Plus he has a weird habit with his glove hand, it's hard to explain but he has a very strange way of catching pucks and he often whiffs on them.

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Name me one other goalie that did this.  Yeah, a goalie's best NHL years will trump his best AHL years, almost always.  But there aren't many guys who manage this - most are really good in the AHL or in European pro leagues and become good in the NHL.

Terry Sawchuk

theres a bunch of them, Roy didnt have great numbers when Montreal called him up, Ed Belfour too

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didnt Marty have an under 900 save % in the AHL?

some goalies make the jump to the NHL and run with it regardless of their performane down in the minors

 

I personally would rather have a veteran as a backup but we'll see

The AHL's league average SV% seems to be a bit below NHL SV% every year. In 92-93 Brodeur put up a .884 SV% in the AHL with the NHL average SV% being .885. So Brodeur was probably just above average or around it for the AHL. As others said before, completely different game then.

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The AHL's league average SV% seems to be a bit below NHL SV% every year. In 92-93 Brodeur put up a .884 SV% in the AHL with the NHL average SV% being .885. So Brodeur was probably just above average or around it for the AHL. As others said before, completely different game then.

what is that supposed to mean?

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I'm wondering what Chad Johnson will cost, now that the Bruins have all but guaranteed his departure from Boston. I think he'd make the best backup. If not him, I also rather like Thomas Greiss as well.

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what is that supposed to mean?

It means Marty's numbers probably were pretty good since save percentage in general was so much lower back then.

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what is that supposed to mean?

You can't compare Brodeur having a sub .900 SV% in the AHL in the early 90's to a goalie prospect today (like Wedgewood for example) that puts up a sub .900 SV% in the AHL. When Brodeur was in the AHL, the league average SV% was a lot lower than it was today. The average AHL SV% was probably around .882-.883. This past season the average SV% in the AHL was about .913. Brodeur probably broke even in Goals Saved Above Average in his AHL season with that SV% while Wedgewood (for example) cost his team an extra 8-9 goals compared to the average AHL G.

 

The sport has changed so much from the high scoring times of the 80's and early 90's to the dead puck era to the post 2005 lockout era. Check out the effects on the average NHL SV% in this graph from QuantHockey.

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In addition the butterfly style wasn't as widely used back then and goaltenders didn't wear padding like they were going to a SWAT situation.

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You can't compare Brodeur having a sub .900 SV% in the AHL in the early 90's to a goalie prospect today (like Wedgewood for example) that puts up a sub .900 SV% in the AHL. When Brodeur was in the AHL, the league average SV% was a lot lower than it was today. The average AHL SV% was probably around .882-.883. This past season the average SV% in the AHL was about .913. Brodeur probably broke even in Goals Saved Above Average in his AHL season with that SV% while Wedgewood (for example) cost his team an extra 8-9 goals compared to the average AHL G.

 

The sport has changed so much from the high scoring times of the 80's and early 90's to the dead puck era to the post 2005 lockout era. Check out the effects on the average NHL SV% in this graph from QuantHockey.

you guys on this board are so wrapped up in stats, that you miss some very obvious points

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you guys on this board are so wrapped up in stats, that you miss some very obvious points

 

No offense 29th, I have liked a lot of your posts, but this post lacks stats and a point.

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you guys on this board are so wrapped up in stats, that you miss some very obvious points

Such as? I think I proved my point fairly clearly and reasonably. Can you show me a list of goalies in the last 20 years who performed below average in the minors and then went on to be successful NHL players?

 

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you guys on this board are so wrapped up in stats, that you miss some very obvious points

 

Great reply. 

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The AHL's league average SV% seems to be a bit below NHL SV% every year. In 92-93 Brodeur put up a .884 SV% in the AHL with the NHL average SV% being .885. So Brodeur was probably just above average or around it for the AHL. As others said before, completely different game then.

 

All one has to do is compare Brodeur's numbers to those of his Utica teammates:

 

Cory Schwab:  40 GP, 4.25 GAA, .883 save%

Chad Erickson:  9 GP, 5.58 GAA, .848 save%

 

Utica also gave up a league-high 354 goals that season.  The only defenseman who went on to have much of an NHL career in terms of longevity was Jaroslav Modry (750 GP).  Kevin Dean played in 331 NHL games and Brent Severyn managed to play in 328 NHL contests (helped by expansion Florida coming into the league).  But anyone who was in net for the 1992-93 Utica Devils wasn't going to have pretty numbers. 

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what is that supposed to mean?

 

Not really so complicated.  Save%s in general were lower in that era than they are now...it was the final years of Live Puck.  It was not uncommon for good offensive teams to score 4+ goals per game (that's unheard of now...basically a team that scores 3+ in this era is considered the benchmark for a "high-scoring" team.  The 2000-01 Devils that scored 295 goals in 82 games was considered to be high-flying and dynamic.  The 1987-88 Devils that also scored 295 goals in 80 GP was average). 

 

And my above post shows that Marty was going from a god-awful defensive team to a very good one.  There's only so much a good goalie can do playing on a poor defensive team...just ask Chico Resch.  No one was putting up a .900+ save% for that Utica team.  When Marty made the team in 1993-94, I doubt his Utica numbers were even taken into consideration (but the team in front of him probably was). 

Edited by Colorado Rockies 1976

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All one has to do is compare Brodeur's numbers to those of his Utica teammates:

 

Cory Schwab:  40 GP, 4.25 GAA, .883 save%

Chad Erickson:  9 GP, 5.58 GAA, .848 save%

 

Utica also gave up a league-high 354 goals that season.  The only defenseman who went on to have much of an NHL career in terms of longevity was Jaroslav Modry (750 GP).  Kevin Dean played in 331 NHL games and Brent Severyn managed to play in 328 NHL contests (helped by expansion Florida coming into the league).  But anyone who was in net for the 1992-93 Utica Devils wasn't going to have pretty numbers. 

 

The Devils allowed a crazy number of shots.  Brodeur saw 34.8 shots against/60.  Schwab saw 36.3 shots against/60.  The team took 1941 penalty minutes - I bet there were a lot of penalties to kill off.

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The Devils allowed a crazy number of shots.  Brodeur saw 34.8 shots against/60.  Schwab saw 36.3 shots against/60.  The team took 1941 penalty minutes - I bet there were a lot of penalties to kill off.

 

There were actually nine teams that had more penalty minutes than the Devils (out of 16 AHL teams).  They scored a fair amount too (325 goals).  They were probably pretty entertaining to watch (though nerve-wracking too).  Marty must've loved the difference when he made it to NJ.

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There were actually nine teams that had more penalty minutes than the Devils (out of 16 AHL teams).  They scored a fair amount too (325 goals).  They were probably pretty entertaining to watch (though nerve-wracking too).  Marty must've loved the difference when he made it to NJ.

 

This doesn't surprise me, but the Devils didn't have anyone with 300 PIMs - guys who get there usually get lots of misconducts.  Point is that minor penalties were way more common in hockey back then.

 

Anyway Brodeur had more talk with Gulitti that makes me nervous because he's clearly set on playing another season and even though he has all this talk about not wanting to get in the way here, he clearly will if it means another season.

Edited by Triumph

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This doesn't surprise me, but the Devils didn't have anyone with 300 PIMs - guys who get there usually get lots of misconducts. Point is that minor penalties were way more common in hockey back then.

Anyway Brodeur had more talk with Gulitti that makes me nervous because he's clearly set on playing another season and even though he has all this talk about not wanting to get in the way here, he clearly will if it means another season.

He is not coming back, and the article,gives no indication that he will.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Lou was pretty clear, about as clear as Lou has been recently, that there is not much of a chance that Marty returns.

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