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Krys Barch Twitter Rant


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#41 devilsfan26

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 02:16 PM

Anyone hating on Barch for this would be similarly pissed if you were in his shoes. Yes, "it's all relative", so imagine you getting a 20% pay-cut, or even worse, not getting paid til you agree to that pay-cut!!!

Hating on how much these athletes make is an entirely different issue and if you felt strongly about that, you wouldn't support them by going to the games or buying their jerseys. Barch and every player has every right to complain, and he did so quite eloquently I think. If this were Janssen's Twitter (if he had one), I'm sure you'd sympathise with him.

Indeed, though I don't think Janssen saying it would matter.
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#42 mouse

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 07:31 PM

Re: Barch's career salary leaving you set for life - that's absurd. Yes, if someone lived like a complete miser while their peer group (which for high level athletes seems to comprise only other high level athletes, and usually those of the same persuasion), they could possibly never work again. Again, when your peer group are millionaires most of whom are living like, well, millionaires, it's tough to live in a studio apartment to save cash. Furthermore, who actually wants to be retired at 35? Barch's larger point is that people who play NHL hockey, by and large, are not set for life. I also am not sure if they should be, but the point is that the money is there. People spend lots of money on the NHL. Where do you want the money to go - players or owners?


Also, not to say they aren't well compensated, but NHL players lose a decent amount of money for work. Most of them live 2 places. They also lose some of their money on offseason training. Thrown in the high tax bracket, and you see how they could lose money. I don't feel bad for them per se, since I survive on a teacher's salary with student loans to pay, but they do have the right to fight to keep their piece of the pie, especially because their efforts have made it a decent sized pie.
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#43 ATLL765

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 10:35 AM

Re: Barch's career salary leaving you set for life - that's absurd. Yes, if someone lived like a complete miser while their peer group (which for high level athletes seems to comprise only other high level athletes, and usually those of the same persuasion), they could possibly never work again. Again, when your peer group are millionaires most of whom are living like, well, millionaires, it's tough to live in a studio apartment to save cash. Furthermore, who actually wants to be retired at 35? Barch's larger point is that people who play NHL hockey, by and large, are not set for life. I also am not sure if they should be, but the point is that the money is there. People spend lots of money on the NHL. Where do you want the money to go - players or owners?

aylbert: The league is not looking long-term. It is not investigating revenue sharing in any significant form. Without that, this cycle will continue to repeat, hurting owners, players, and fans.


If you have a couple million and you're smart with your investments, you won't have to "work" another day in your life.
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#44 DevsMan84

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 10:45 AM

If Barch wants to trade his salary for mine I am down for it.

Cry me a fvcking river.
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#45 Triumph

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:32 PM

If you have a couple million and you're smart with your investments, you won't have to "work" another day in your life.


Yes, this is true, but what are the odds this happens? How many athletes retire on that kind of money and avoid bankruptcy? Not many. And there's reasons beyond 'athletes are dumb'.
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#46 NJDevs4978

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:52 PM

A lot of 'normal' people aren't smart with their money either. Plus there's non-monetary considerations that athletes face, like being away from their family for large chunks at a time, although it doesn't seem to be as much of an issue for the players that are going overseas :P

Edited by NJDevs4978, 04 October 2012 - 03:53 PM.

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#47 devilsfan26

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 08:27 PM

If Barch wants to trade his salary for mine I am down for it.

Cry me a fvcking river.

Yeah except he isn't comparing his salary with yours. He's frustrated with the owners asking them to all take a pay cut despite their contracts that the owners offered and signed.
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#48 DevsMan84

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 08:40 PM

Yeah except he isn't comparing his salary with yours. He's frustrated with the owners asking them to all take a pay cut despite their contracts that the owners offered and signed.


Then he can trade is post pay cut salary with mine and I will take it every time.

I know he was promised a salary with a contract but hard to feel sorry for a guy where current league minimum is about $500,000 a year. With that money they can cut that in half and I would be more than happy with that salary.
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#49 Triumph

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 08:59 PM

Then he can trade is post pay cut salary with mine and I will take it every time.

I know he was promised a salary with a contract but hard to feel sorry for a guy where current league minimum is about $500,000 a year. With that money they can cut that in half and I would be more than happy with that salary.


I don't think Barch is asking anyone to feel sorry for him. He is telling people why the players are upset and why games aren't happening. The players aren't set for life. All of them don't have a winning lottery ticket.

Also, I imagine your job doesn't involve taking punches in the face. More than anyone in the NHL, enforcers 'earn' their money - and they certainly pay for it.
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#50 devilsfan26

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 09:03 PM

Then he can trade is post pay cut salary with mine and I will take it every time.

I know he was promised a salary with a contract but hard to feel sorry for a guy where current league minimum is about $500,000 a year. With that money they can cut that in half and I would be more than happy with that salary.

Yeah except you don't have the athletic ability that gets you that kind of salary. The point is ANYONE in their position, regardless of salary would be rightfully pissed off about what the owners are doing to them.
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#51 David Puddy

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 10:05 PM

Then he can trade is post pay cut salary with mine and I will take it every time.

I know he was promised a salary with a contract but hard to feel sorry for a guy where current league minimum is about $500,000 a year. With that money they can cut that in half and I would be more than happy with that salary.


I guarantee that whatever you make, there are plenty of people out there who would be happy to make half of your salary.
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#52 DJ Eco

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 09:26 AM

Look, I'm not going to go out and feel bad for the guy. I do understand their situation and agree that he has EVERY RIGHT to be pissed off; it's his money, it's his agreed-upon, signed-on, contract, why wouldn't he pissed off? What's wrong with you guys, to be turning this into a "me vs. them" debate for no reason? If that's really how you felt, you wouldn't be going to hockey games to support their salaries. Try and put a more objective hat on.

I think, what's interesting in this Barch example, and examples of less-paid enforcers like him is that it brings me back to the Boogaard and Rypien discussions we were having this time last year. A lot of these guys aren't "all there", a lot of them are just happy to be playing in the NHL, and are living in the moment and taking advantage of the card they've been dealt; I'm sure a lot of them aren't surrounded by the best management or agents, and probably not the best financial advisors or accountants.

So YOU can probably stretch $750,000 a year for 10 years to feed you until you're in your 70s? Who the F cares? You're not them. And if you were, you'd be pissed no matter what that the team owners are treading back on the contracts and salaries you were already promised, simple as that. You're more "selfish" than Barch the moment you think the conversation should turn into his salary vs. yours.

Edited by DJ Eco, 05 October 2012 - 09:28 AM.

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#53 DevsMan84

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 09:44 AM

I don't think Barch is asking anyone to feel sorry for him. He is telling people why the players are upset and why games aren't happening. The players aren't set for life. All of them don't have a winning lottery ticket.

Also, I imagine your job doesn't involve taking punches in the face. More than anyone in the NHL, enforcers 'earn' their money - and they certainly pay for it.


His job involves using his body while mine requires my mind. I "earn" my money just as much as he does in my opinion even if we work totally different jobs. That is like saying a ditch digger should get paid more for his work than a doctor who went to medical school and probably has a sh!tload of student loans. Yes, not 100% fair to compare jobs as it is apples to oranges but our salaries are indeed vastly different and many often people who are in business who are making $500,000 are living more than a comortable lifestyle.

Yeah except you don't have the athletic ability that gets you that kind of salary. The point is ANYONE in their position, regardless of salary would be rightfully pissed off about what the owners are doing to them.


And Barch probably couldn't do the job that I do now. It works both ways.

Edited by DevsMan84, 05 October 2012 - 09:47 AM.

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#54 DevsMan84

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 09:47 AM

Look, I'm not going to go out and feel bad for the guy. I do understand their situation and agree that he has EVERY RIGHT to be pissed off; it's his money, it's his agreed-upon, signed-on, contract, why wouldn't he pissed off? What's wrong with you guys, to be turning this into a "me vs. them" debate for no reason? If that's really how you felt, you wouldn't be going to hockey games to support their salaries. Try and put a more objective hat on.

I think, what's interesting in this Barch example, and examples of less-paid enforcers like him is that it brings me back to the Boogaard and Rypien discussions we were having this time last year. A lot of these guys aren't "all there", a lot of them are just happy to be playing in the NHL, and are living in the moment and taking advantage of the card they've been dealt; I'm sure a lot of them aren't surrounded by the best management or agents, and probably not the best financial advisors or accountants.

So YOU can probably stretch $750,000 a year for 10 years to feed you until you're in your 70s? Who the F cares? You're not them. And if you were, you'd be pissed no matter what that the team owners are treading back on the contracts and salaries you were already promised, simple as that. You're more "selfish" than Barch the moment you think the conversation should turn into his salary vs. yours.


You make $750,000 a year seem like peanuts. I would love to earn even a quarter of that a year!

Also I remember hearing a statistic saying the average college bachelor graduate earns in his or her lifetime something like $2 million. So if he has to "stretch" $7.5 million over a lifetime then he should put his spending into check or fire his accountant.
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#55 David Puddy

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 10:59 AM

If all the people who earned that much money hoarded it to last a lifetime, it would destroy the economy, or at least large portions of it. The NHL wouldn't exist because all the thrifty rich people worried about stretching their income out over their entire lifetimes would not be spending on expensive entertainment like going to sporting events. It's the paradox of thrift.
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#56 DJ Eco

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 04:11 PM

You make $750,000 a year seem like peanuts. I would love to earn even a quarter of that a year!

Also I remember hearing a statistic saying the average college bachelor graduate earns in his or her lifetime something like $2 million. So if he has to "stretch" $7.5 million over a lifetime then he should put his spending into check or fire his accountant.


Well, first of all, about half of that gets taken out in taxes. Second of all, this was never about him trying to get pity from you guys or compare his situation with you guys. Generally speaking, it's about a group of employees whose bosses are putting a gun to their head to take a pay-cut on contracts and salaries that have already been agreed upon. Who cares that everyone in this forum would LOVE to make an NHL players' salary? It really has no place in the discussion at hand. It's overreacting over 5% of what his comments are about, and dismissing the other 95%.

The same sh!t is happening to teachers and laborers around the country, and maybe many of us here. We're neck-deep in an era of complete greed, and while the American worker is being taken advantage of, all we do is argue with each other about the petty stuff like unions, or whether or not we'd "love to make what Barch is making", or how much more character we think we have.

You can hop on your high-horse and label this as millionaires vs. billionaires, or you can see that this is just the tip of the iceberg of what's going on throughout the rest of corporate America. We, the sports and hockey freaks, are insulated because our sports allow us to forget about that stuff to an extent, but now it's affecting our sports, this whole era of greed and money. And yep, you guessed it, the source of the problem has its offices based in New York City, just like Wall Street, just like every other company that fvcked this country over. New York is like a hotbed of spineless greed and we're feeling it everywhere from gas prices to education prices and now hockey; they're taking over our sport, with their greed and dollar signs in their eyes.

Edited by DJ Eco, 05 October 2012 - 04:16 PM.

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#57 DevsMan84

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 04:21 PM

Well, first of all, about half of that gets taken out in taxes. Second of all, this was never about him trying to get pity from you guys or compare his situation with you guys. Generally speaking, it's about a group of employees whose bosses are putting a gun to their head to take a pay-cut on contracts and salaries that have already been agreed upon. Who cares that everyone in this forum would LOVE to make an NHL players' salary? It really has no place in the discussion at hand. It's overreacting over 5% of what his comments are about, and dismissing the other 95%.

The same sh!t is happening to teachers and laborers around the country, and maybe many of us here. We're neck-deep in an era of complete greed, and while the American worker is being taken advantage of, all we do is argue with each other about the petty stuff like unions, or whether or not we'd "love to make what Barch is making", or how much more character we think we have.

You can hop on your high-horse and label this as millionaires vs. billionaires, or you can see that this is just the tip of the iceberg of what's going on throughout the rest of corporate America. We, the sports and hockey freaks, are insulated because our sports allow us to forget about that stuff to an extent, but now it's affecting our sports, this whole era of greed and money. And yep, you guessed it, the source of the problem has its offices based in New York City, just like Wall Street, just like every other company that fvcked this country over. New York is like a hotbed of spineless greed and we're feeling it everywhere from gas prices to education prices and now hockey; they're taking over our sport, with their greed and dollar signs in their eyes.


lol you sound like a union member.

But again $3.75 million after taxes is more than I will ever see in my lifetime I will tell you that much.

I agree the owners deserve plenty of blame and like you said they are the ones dishing out these outrageous contracts to now trying to rein them in and act like it's not their fault. However if the players are asking for sympathy and are crying poverty I do not want to hear that either. Right now my mindset is that both the players and the owners are 50/50 to blame for this mess and they cut the crap out and fix this sooner rather than later.
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#58 DJ Eco

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 04:21 PM

A little dramatic, I know ^^^ But I'm riled up, and really need some hockey...
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#59 DJ Eco

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 04:30 PM

lol you sound like a union member.


I'm not, but yeah, my views are along those lines lol..


I agree the owners deserve plenty of blame and like you said they are the ones dishing out these outrageous contracts to now trying to rein them in and act like it's not their fault. However if the players are asking for sympathy and are crying poverty I do not want to hear that either. Right now my mindset is that both the players and the owners are 50/50 to blame for this mess and they cut the crap out and fix this sooner rather than later.


Nope, it's almost entirely the owners' fault. You bring up a good point. They threw a ton of money out to some of these players and are now crying that they want a new deal. Look at Philly's Weber offer; look at the Rangers' huge contracts, look at Parise's and Suter's contracts. These are absurd amounts of money that are dictated by supply and demand, but the buck stops with the owners. If no one offers Weber $110 million, he stays on the market for a year or more, his value diminishes and that's the end of the story.

They caused this overinflated mayhem, not the players or their agents. They said yes to the agents' massive demands and signed on the dotted line, so the buck stops with them. The fact that the players were okay with playing hockey while a new deal was reached means something. But the NHL said "NO!" and locked them out, so it's officially their fault. A "lockout" is not a default action that happens, it is always initiated by the league and Bettman. So, the league proactively announced a lockout, the owners followed through with it. It's their fault as far as I'm concerned.

And on the flip-side, it wasn't really like a union in that the players didn't "go on strike", they were actively not allowed to practice or play. So on a very simple level, I side with them.

Edited by DJ Eco, 05 October 2012 - 04:36 PM.

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