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Check out what the Devils front office just sent me along with my play


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#121 CHIP72

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 08:51 PM

And as I've stated in this thread and others, what is of utmost importance to this ownership group (as should be to any owner that isn't JVB or Pegula or one of us if we won Powerball) is maximum average ticket value. they would rather get 12,000 averaging $75/ticket ($900k) than 16500 at $50/ticket ($825k).

 

Most fans who attend hockey games or sports events in general spend money on food and drinks, and some of them (more likely the hardcore fans who are in non-premium seats) spend money on apparel too.  That revenue from the extra 4500 fans in your example above probably more than offsets the $75K shortfall that occurs from selling cheaper tickets.


Edited by CHIP72, 14 March 2014 - 08:54 PM.

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#122 sundstrom

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 09:39 PM

Most fans who attend hockey games or sports events in general spend money on food and drinks, and some of them (more likely the hardcore fans who are in non-premium seats) spend money on apparel too.  That revenue from the extra 4500 fans in your example above probably more than offsets the $75K shortfall that occurs from selling cheaper tickets.

 

maybe - but the devils do not get nearly as high a percentage of concession dollars as they do ticket price.


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#123 ThreeCups

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 12:52 PM

Exactly. The club seat setup as it is now is AWESOME. That same setup with a $30 food credit instead of all-you-can-eat is laughable. 

 

+1

 

Cannot wait to see what the reaction of the people with seasons in there is...


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#124 Matteau#32

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 01:50 PM

I reeived a call this past August from someone in the Devils ticket office trying to sell me a package.  I immediately told him I was a Rangers fan and season ticket holder so he was wasting his time trying to sell to me.  He insisted he wasn't saying they have fans of different teams buying Devils ticket packages regularly.  He went through his pitch, trying to sell me full-seasons, half-seasons and a bunch of different packages.  I finally told him the only way I would be interested is if he could put together a package where I get all the Rangers games (for me), all the Flyers games (for my best friend who is a Flyers fan), all the Penguins games (for my penguin fan brother) and then maybe 3 additional games for a friend who is a casual devils fan.  He goes to 2-3 games a year, but usually because someone has an extra ticket. Told him I would have to check with all these people to see if they were interested.  He said he couldn't do this, but then he had an idea.  Suggested I buy 1/2 seasons.  Said, I could use the Rangers games, give the Flyers, and Pens games to my friend and brother, then the 2-3 games to my other friend.  

 

When I asked about the rest, HE SUGGESTED SELLING THEM ON THE SECONDARY MARKET!   Pointed out the scalping laws have been repealed and even said, "what A LOT of our full-season ticket holders do is sell a few of the premium games for a nice profit to off-set their costs."  That turned into a debate about the value of devils tickets on the secondary market.  Let's just say I pointed out that I would want to USE the premium games as I had said (rangers, pen, flyers), and a few other things about Devils tickets that didnt make him too happy.  Finally, I told him I needed to go.  Told him I would talk to my brother, friends and he was free to call me in a few weeks to see if there was any interest.  He did, and I declined.  Even asked a friend who is an Islanders fan, but will go to any game and/or use them for his business and he wasn't interested.  

 

Point?  On one hand their reps are using the secondary market as a selling point to potential customers, and now using it as a threat to their actual customers.


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#125 Matteau#32

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 01:54 PM

Most fans who attend hockey games or sports events in general spend money on food and drinks, and some of them (more likely the hardcore fans who are in non-premium seats) spend money on apparel too.  That revenue from the extra 4500 fans in your example above probably more than offsets the $75K shortfall that occurs from selling cheaper tickets.

Not always.  I go to A LOT of games in all sports.  Hardly spend any money inside.  95% of the time I have lunch or dinner tailgating or at a nearby restaurant and generally do not drink during games.  As far as apparel, I never buy any at the arenas/stadium.  Most people I know who go to games are more like me than the guy who goes in spends money.


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#126 Neb00rs

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 01:55 PM

When I asked about the rest, HE SUGGESTED SELLING THEM ON THE SECONDARY MARKET!   Pointed out the scalping laws have been repealed and even said, "what A LOT of our full-season ticket holders do is sell a few of the premium games for a nice profit to off-set their costs."  That turned into a debate about the value of devils tickets on the secondary market.  Let's just say I pointed out that I would want to USE the premium games as I had said (rangers, pen, flyers), and a few other things about Devils tickets that didnt make him too happy.  Finally, I told him I needed to go.  Told him I would talk to my brother, friends and he was free to call me in a few weeks to see if there was any interest.  He did, and I declined.  Even asked a friend who is an Islanders fan, but will go to any game and/or use them for his business and he wasn't interested.  

 

Point?  On one hand their reps are using the secondary market as a selling point to potential customers, and now using it as a threat to their actual customers.

 

If this is true, the Devils might be in legal trouble if they start to rescind season tickets. If agents of the team/company  are telling people to do it, and then they do it, and then the team takes their tickets away, that's a big No-No in the legal realm.

 

CHIP72, on 14 Mar 2014 - 9:51 PM, said:
Most fans who attend hockey games or sports events in general spend money on food and drinks, and some of them (more likely the hardcore fans who are in non-premium seats) spend money on apparel too.  That revenue from the extra 4500 fans in your example above probably more than offsets the $75K shortfall that occurs from selling cheaper tickets.

 

 

Yeah. Completely untrue.


Edited by Neb00rs, 15 March 2014 - 01:57 PM.

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#127 2ELIAS6

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:00 PM

id like to know how they are actually finding out who is selling their tickets on stubhub.. there has to be a way where they can tell maybe who the tickets are being electronically emailed to or something because stubhub says that they do no give out any seller information what so ever..i dont know where the information is coming from then
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#128 Matteau#32

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:02 PM

Thanks for the links.  I know that seasons tickets could always be rescinded for certain causes (mostly unruly behavior, like when Giants fans threw snowballs onto the field, etc.), but clearly the emergence of Stubhub and other outlets is forcing franchises to come down on scalpers and those who go through "legal" scalpers harder.  Still curious how many teams overall are taking action similar to what the Devils are doing.    

In most states, when scalping laws were repealed a few years back, part of the law was also that teams could not revoke season tickets for re-selling.  Not sure about the law in NJ.  Although, this MIGHT only apply to PSL holders.


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#129 Matteau#32

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:06 PM

id like to know how they are actually finding out who is selling their tickets on stubhub.. there has to be a way where they can tell maybe who the tickets are being electronically emailed to or something because stubhub says that they do no give out any seller information what so ever..i dont know where the information is coming from then

 

1) if you list the seat numbers

 

2) not sure if you can upload just the barcodes for devils tickets to stubhub, in which case you download the tickets and when scanned, the computer might know they are stubhub tickets.  For Rangers and Leafs tickets, you can only upload PDF's for instant download for the buyer.


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#130 Matteau#32

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:12 PM

If this is true, the Devils might be in legal trouble if they start to rescind season tickets. If agents of the team/company  are telling people to do it, and then they do it, and then the team takes their tickets away, that's a big No-No in the legal realm.

Well, this was in August.  They could always change their policy.  It would be one thing if they threatened to revoke tickets mid-season, which happened to a friend of a friend years ago with the Rangers.  BUT, if they implement this policy moving forward and their reps STILL use it as part of their pitch, then I would think you would be correct and it could cause a problem.


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#131 Matteau#32

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:22 PM

As far as WHY they would do this I can think of 2 reasons.  1) they want less competition for individual game sales.  If for arguments sake, they sell 10,000 tickets to full and partial sth (really have no idea on the actual number, just throwing it out there to make a point) that leaves about 9000 to sell individually.  Well, if 3000 of the STH have their tickets listed, it drives the equilibrium price down.  And, while not everyone would buy one of those 3000 from sth, the team still sees it as money out of their pocket.

 

2) they must be having a higher turnover and wouldn't be shocked if they are hearing from full and partial STH's that it isn't worth it as they can get tickets cheaper for most games on stubhub.  On the otherhand, the rep who called me, WAS offering a MUCH better price than the individual ticket prices.  


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#132 Neb00rs

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:23 PM

In most states, when scalping laws were repealed a few years back, part of the law was also that teams could not revoke season tickets for re-selling.  Not sure about the law in NJ.  Although, this MIGHT only apply to PSL holders.

 

The issue is that this only applies to what they call 'legal scalping'. Both NJ and NY have passed harsh restrictions on how much you can resell tickets for, what you have to do to be eligible to sell tickets, and where you can sell the tickets. In other words, the protection you have mentioned pretty much protects no one.

 

I think this is important for the board to see so I have pasted the law below and I have picked out and enlarged the operative clauses beforehand. 

 

From the NJDCA Consumer Fraud Act:

 

Operative sections that I have picked out:

 

56:8‐27  Requirements for ticket broker.

  2.  No ticket broker shall engage in or continue in the business of reselling tickets for admission to
a place of entertainment without meeting the following requirements:

  a.  Owning, operating or maintaining a permanent office, branch office, bureau, agency, or other
place of business, not including a post office box, for the purpose of reselling tickets;

  b.  Obtaining a certificate of registration to resell or engage in the business of reselling tickets from
the director;

  c.  Listing the ticket broker's registration number in any form of advertisement or solicitation in
which tickets are being sold for the purpose of purchase by the general public for events in this State;

  d.  Maintaining records of ticket sales, deposits and refunds for a period of not less than two years
from the time of any of these transactions;

 

56:8‐32.  Display of license;  copies

    Immediately upon the receipt of the  license  issued pursuant to this act, the    licensee shall display and
maintain his license in a conspicuous place in his  principal office for reselling tickets.  He shall request copies
of the license   from the director for the purpose of displaying a copy of the license in each   branch office,
bureau or agency and the director may charge a fee for the  copies.

 

 

b.  No person other than a registered ticket broker shall resell or purchase with the intent to resell
a ticket for admission to a place of entertainment at a maximum premium in excess of 20% of the ticket price
or $3.00, whichever is greater, plus lawful taxes. No registered ticket broker shall resell or purchase with the
intent to resell a ticket for admission to a place of entertainment at a premium in excess of 50% of the price
paid to acquire the ticket, plus lawful taxes.

 

56:8‐34  Reselling tickets prohibited in certain area; exceptions.

  9.   a.   No person shall resell or purchase with the  intent to resell any ticket,  in or on any street,
highway, driveway, sidewalk, parking area, or common area owned by a place of entertainment in this State,
or any other area adjacent to or in the vicinity of any place of entertainment in this State as determined by the
director; except that a person may resell, in an area which may be designated by a place of entertainment in
this State, any ticket or tickets originally purchased for his own personal or family use at no greater than the
lawful price permitted under this act.

 

56:8‐37.  Violations;  penalty

    Any person who violates any provision of this act shall be guilty of a crime  of the fourth degree.

 

Full law:

 

56:8‐26  Definitions. 
  
  1.  As used in this act: 
 
  a.  "Director" means the director of the Division of Consumer Affairs in the Department of Law and 
Public Safety. 
  
  b.  "Division" means the Division of Consumer Affairs in the Department of Law and Public Safety. 
  
  c.  "Person" means corporations, companies, associations, societies, firms, partnerships and joint 
stock companies as well as individuals. 
  
  d.  "Place of entertainment" means any privately or publicly owned and operated entertainment 
facility  within  this  State,  such  as  a  theater,  stadium,  museum,  arena,  racetrack  or  other  place  where 
performances, concerts, exhibits, games or contests are held and for which an entry fee is charged. 
  
  e.  "Ticket" means any piece of paper which indicates that the bearer has paid for entry or other 
evidence which permits entry to a place of entertainment. 
  
  f.  "Ticket broker" means any person situated in and operating in this State who is involved in the 
business of reselling tickets of admission to places of entertainment and who charges a premium in excess of 
the price, plus taxes, printed on the tickets.  For the purposes of this act, the term "ticket broker" shall not 
include an individual not regularly engaged in the business of reselling tickets, who resells less than 30 tickets 
during any one‐year period, and who obtained the tickets for his own use, or the use of his family, friends, or 
acquaintances. 
  
  g.  "Resale"  means  a  sale  by  a  person  other  than  the  owner  or  operator  of  a  place  of 
entertainment or of the entertainment event or an agent of any such person. 
  J Division of Consumer Affairs 
Consumer Fraud Act 

Post:  9/2011  Page 23 

  h.  "Resell" means to offer for resale or to consummate a resale. 
  
  i.  "Digger" means a person temporarily hired for the purpose of securing tickets by intimidating a 
purchaser waiting in line to procure event tickets. 
  
  L.1983, c.135, s.1; amended 1983, c.220, s.1; 2001, c.394, s.1; 2008, c.55, s.1. 
 
56:8‐27  Requirements for ticket broker. 
  2.  No ticket broker shall engage in or continue in the business of reselling tickets for admission to 
a place of entertainment without meeting the following requirements: 
 
  a.  Owning, operating or maintaining a permanent office, branch office, bureau, agency, or other 
place of business, not including a post office box, for the purpose of reselling tickets; 
 
  b.  Obtaining a certificate of registration to resell or engage in the business of reselling tickets from 
the director; 
 
  c.  Listing the ticket broker's registration number in any form of advertisement or solicitation in 
which tickets are being sold for the purpose of purchase by the general public for events in this State; 
 
  d.  Maintaining records of ticket sales, deposits and refunds for a period of not less than two years 
from the time of any of these transactions; 
 
  e.  Disclosing to the purchaser, by means of verbal description or a map, the location of the seats 
represented by the tickets; 
 
  f.  Disclosing to the purchaser the cancellation policy of that broker; 
 
  g.  Disclosing that a service charge is added by the ticket broker to the stated price on the tickets 
and is included by the broker in any advertisement or promotion for an event; 
 
  h.  Disclosing to the purchaser, whenever applicable, that the ticket broker has a guarantee policy.  
If a ticket broker guarantees delivery of tickets to a purchaser and fails to deliver the tickets, the ticket broker 
shall provide a full refund for the cost of the tickets; 
 
  i.  Disclosing to the purchaser of tickets when he is utilizing a tentative order policy, popularly 
known as a "try and get."  When a ticket broker fails to obtain tickets on a "try and get" basis, the broker shall 
refund any deposit made by a purchaser of those tickets within a reasonable time, as shall be determined by 
the director; 
 
  j.  When guaranteeing tickets in conjunction with providing a tour package, a ticket broker who 
fails to provide a purchaser with those tickets shall refund fully the price of the tour package and tickets; and 

 

k.  Providing to a purchaser of tickets who cancels an order a full refund for the cost of the tickets 

less shipping charges, if those  tickets are returned to the broker within three days after receipt; provided, that 
when tickets are purchased within seven days of an event, a refund shall be given only if the tickets are 
returned  within  one  day  of receipt;  and  further  provided, that  no refund shall  be  given  on  any tickets 
purchased within six days of an event unless the ticket broker is able to resell the tickets. 
 
  L.1983,c.135,s.2; amended 1983, c.220, s.2; 2001, c.394, s.2. 
 
56:8‐28  Application for registration, fee. 
  3.    a.    The  division shall  prepare  and furnish to  applicants for registration  application forms  and 
requirements prescribed by the director pertaining to the applications for and the issuance of certificates of 
registration to ticket brokers. 
 
  b.  Every applicant for a certificate of registration to engage in the business of reselling tickets as a 
ticket broker shall file a written application with the division on the form furnished by, and consistent with, 
the regulations prescribed by the director. 
 
  c.  Each application shall be accompanied by a fee which shall be determined by the director and 
shall not exceed $500, and a description of the location where the applicant proposes to conduct his business. 
 
  L.1983,c.135,s.3; amended 2001, c.394, s.3. 
 
56:8‐29  Issuance of certificate of registration. 
  4.  a.  Within 120 days after receipt of the completed application, fee and bond, if any, and when the 
director is satisfied that the applicant has complied with all of the requirements of this act, the director shall 
grant and issue a certificate of registration to the applicant. 
 
  b.  The  certificate of registration granted may be renewed for a period of two years upon the 
payment of a renewal fee which shall be determined by the director and shall not exceed $500. 
 
  c.  No  certificate  of registration shall  be transferred  or  assigned  without the  approval  of the 
director.  Any request for a change in the location of the premises operated by any registrant situated in and 
operating  in this  State shall  be submitted to the  director  in  writing  no  less than  30  days  prior to that 
relocation.   The certificate of registration shall run to January 1 in the second year next ensuing the date 
thereof unless sooner revoked by the director. 
 
  L.1983,c.135,s.4; amended 2001, c.394, s.4. 
 
56:8‐30  Bond required to engage in business of reselling tickets as a ticket broker. 
  5.  The director shall require the applicant for a certificate of registration to engage in the business 
of reselling tickets as a ticket broker to file with the application a bond in the amount of $10,000.00 with two NJ Division of Consumer Affairs 
Consumer Fraud Act 

Post:  9/2011  Page 25 

or more sufficient sureties or an authorized surety company, which bond shall be approved by the director. 
 
  Each bond shall be conditioned on the promise that the applicant, his agents or employees will not be 
guilty of fraud or extortion, will not violate any of the provisions of this act, will comply with the rules and 
regulations promulgated by the director, and will pay all damages occasioned to any person by reason of 
misstatement, misrepresentation, fraud or deceit or  any unlawful  act or omission  in  connection with the 
provisions of this act and the business conducted under this act. 
 
  L.1983,c.135,s.5; amended 2001, c.394, s.5. 
 
56:8‐31.  Revocation or suspension of license 
    The director, after notice to the licensee and reasonable opportunity for the licensee to be heard, may 
revoke  his  license  or  may suspend  his  license  for    any  period  which  the  director  deems  proper,  upon 
satisfactory proof that the  licensee has violated this act, any condition of his license or any rule or  regulation 
of the division promulgated pursuant to this act. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 6. 
 
56:8‐32.  Display of license;  copies 
    Immediately upon the receipt of the  license  issued pursuant to this act, the    licensee shall display and 
maintain his license in a conspicuous place in his  principal office for reselling tickets.  He shall request copies 
of the license   from the director for the purpose of displaying a copy of the license in each   branch office, 
bureau or agency and the director may charge a fee for the  copies. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 7. 
 
56:8‐33  Price charged printed on ticket, maximum premium for reseller; exceptions. 
  
  8. a. Each place of entertainment shall print on the face of each ticket and include in any advertising for 
any event the price charged therefor. 
  
  b.  No person other than a registered ticket broker shall resell or purchase with the intent to resell 
a ticket for admission to a place of entertainment at a maximum premium in excess of 20% of the ticket price 
or $3.00, whichever is greater, plus lawful taxes. No registered ticket broker shall resell or purchase with the 
intent to resell a ticket for admission to a place of entertainment at a premium in excess of 50% of the price 
paid to acquire the ticket, plus lawful taxes. 
  
  c.  Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection a. or b. of this section, nothing shall limit the price 
for the resale or purchase of a ticket for admission to a place of entertainment sold by any person other than a 
registered ticket broker, provided such resale or purchase is made through an Internet web site. 
   L.1983, c.135, s.8; amended 1983, c.220, s.3; 2001, c.394, s.6; 2008, c.55, s.2. 
 NJ Division of Consumer Affairs 
Consumer Fraud Act 

Post:  9/2011  Page 26 

56:8‐34  Reselling tickets prohibited in certain area; exceptions. 
  9.   a.   No person shall resell or purchase with the  intent to resell any ticket,  in or on any street, 
highway, driveway, sidewalk, parking area, or common area owned by a place of entertainment in this State, 
or any other area adjacent to or in the vicinity of any place of entertainment in this State as determined by the 
director; except that a person may resell, in an area which may be designated by a place of entertainment in 
this State, any ticket or tickets originally purchased for his own personal or family use at no greater than the 
lawful price permitted under this act. 
 
  L.1983,c.135,s.9; amended 1983, c.220, s.4; 2001, c.394, s.7. 
 
56:8‐35.  Special treatment in obtaining tickets;  prohibition 
    Any person who gives or offers anything of value to an employee of a place of entertainment in exchange 
for, or as an inducement to, special treatment with respect to obtaining tickets, or any employee of a place of 
entertainment who receives or solicits anything of value in exchange for special treatment with respect to 
issuing tickets, shall be in violation of this act. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 10.  Amended by L.1983, c. 220, s. 5. 
 
56:8‐35.1  Withholding tickets from sale, prohibited amount. 
  8.  It shall be an unlawful practice for a person, who has access to tickets to an event prior to the 
tickets' release for sale to the general public, to withhold those tickets from sale to the general public in an 
amount exceeding 5% of all available seating for the event. 
 
  L.2001,c.394,s.8. 
 
56:8‐35.2  Refunds prohibited under certain circumstances. 
  9.  A purchaser of tickets who places a special order with a ticket broker for tickets that are not in 
stock or are obtained for a purchaser's specific need and are paid for in advance by the ticket broker, shall not 
be eligible to receive a refund for that purchase unless the ticket broker is able to find someone else to 
purchase the tickets and as long as the purchaser is notified in advance of this policy. 
  L.2001,c.394,s.9. 
 
56:8‐35.3  Method for lawful sell back. 
  11.  The director and places of entertainment shall create a method for season ticket holders and other 
ticket holders to lawfully sell back tickets to the venue for events they will not be able to attend. 
 
  L.2001,c.394,s.11. 
 
56:8‐35.4  Use of digger unlawful. 
  12.  It shall be an unlawful practice for a person to use a digger to acquire any ticket. 
  L.2001,c.394,s.12. 
 NJ Division of Consumer Affairs 
Consumer Fraud Act 

Post:  9/2011  Page 27 

56:8‐36.  Rules and regulations 
    The director, pursuant to the provisions of the  "Administrative Procedure Act,"  P.L.1968, c. 410 (C. 52:14B‐
1 et seq.), shall promulgate rules and regulations necessary to implement this act. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 11. 
 
56:8‐37.  Violations;  penalty 
    Any person who violates any provision of this act shall be guilty of a crime  of the fourth degree. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 12. 
 
56:8‐38.  Nonprofit or political organizations;  application of act 
    The provisions of this act shall not apply to any person who sells, raffles  or otherwise disposes of the ticket 
for a bona fide nonprofit or political   organization when the premium proceeds are devoted to the lawful 
purposes of  the organization. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 13. 


Edited by Neb00rs, 15 March 2014 - 02:29 PM.

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#133 sundstrom

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:29 PM

+1

 

Cannot wait to see what the reaction of the people with seasons in there is...

 

well i can tell you i was initially pretty pissed about it because i take full advantage of the free food and at stadium prices, eat on average more than $30/game. But my wife who usually goes with me does not. So we were leaving money on the table.

 

So I'll initially save $2640 from what I paid last year. Factor in that I go to about 30 of the 44 games so the 14 tickets that i give to employees/clients/family will pay their own food instead of me paying it ($840 savings) and that because it's not all you can eat, the wife and i will probably eat about $40/game total ($20 savings/30 games - $600). So with this change, I essentially save $1400-$1500 for the same thing next year as i pay this year.


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#134 HellOnICE

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:47 PM

It's not a bad idea for the $30 surcharge. There's money left on the table for sure, but I know my father and I head over to Dino or somewhere else pre-game and don't touch the food in there. Also, the quality has been questionable.


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#135 Blown01NJ

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 11:02 PM

Yeah apparently they are getting rid of the all you can eat food in the club seats.  In exchange the seats are now going to be listed at $150-180 instead of $250-280.

 

The other rumors I hear is that there will be 2 tiers:

1) $150 ticket gets you into the club and that's it.  You must pay for everything else

2) $180 ticket gets you into the club and a $30 food and beverage card.

 

If that's true why would anyone get the $180 seat


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#136 Matteau#32

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 07:34 AM

The issue is that this only applies to what they call 'legal scalping'. Both NJ and NY have passed harsh restrictions on how much you can resell tickets for, what you have to do to be eligible to sell tickets, and where you can sell the tickets. In other words, the protection you have mentioned pretty much protects no one.

 

I think this is important for the board to see so I have pasted the law below and I have picked out and enlarged the operative clauses beforehand. 

 

From the NJDCA Consumer Fraud Act:

 

Operative sections that I have picked out:

 

56:8‐27  Requirements for ticket broker.

  2.  No ticket broker shall engage in or continue in the business of reselling tickets for admission to
a place of entertainment without meeting the following requirements:

  a.  Owning, operating or maintaining a permanent office, branch office, bureau, agency, or other
place of business, not including a post office box, for the purpose of reselling tickets;

  b.  Obtaining a certificate of registration to resell or engage in the business of reselling tickets from
the director;

  c.  Listing the ticket broker's registration number in any form of advertisement or solicitation in
which tickets are being sold for the purpose of purchase by the general public for events in this State;

  d.  Maintaining records of ticket sales, deposits and refunds for a period of not less than two years
from the time of any of these transactions;

 

56:8‐32.  Display of license;  copies

    Immediately upon the receipt of the  license  issued pursuant to this act, the    licensee shall display and
maintain his license in a conspicuous place in his  principal office for reselling tickets.  He shall request copies
of the license   from the director for the purpose of displaying a copy of the license in each   branch office,
bureau or agency and the director may charge a fee for the  copies.

 

 

b.  No person other than a registered ticket broker shall resell or purchase with the intent to resell
a ticket for admission to a place of entertainment at a maximum premium in excess of 20% of the ticket price
or $3.00, whichever is greater, plus lawful taxes. No registered ticket broker shall resell or purchase with the
intent to resell a ticket for admission to a place of entertainment at a premium in excess of 50% of the price
paid to acquire the ticket, plus lawful taxes.

 

56:8‐34  Reselling tickets prohibited in certain area; exceptions.

  9.   a.   No person shall resell or purchase with the  intent to resell any ticket,  in or on any street,
highway, driveway, sidewalk, parking area, or common area owned by a place of entertainment in this State,
or any other area adjacent to or in the vicinity of any place of entertainment in this State as determined by the
director; except that a person may resell, in an area which may be designated by a place of entertainment in
this State, any ticket or tickets originally purchased for his own personal or family use at no greater than the
lawful price permitted under this act.

 

56:8‐37.  Violations;  penalty

    Any person who violates any provision of this act shall be guilty of a crime  of the fourth degree.

 

Full law:

 

56:8‐26  Definitions. 
  
  1.  As used in this act: 
 
  a.  "Director" means the director of the Division of Consumer Affairs in the Department of Law and 
Public Safety. 
  
  b.  "Division" means the Division of Consumer Affairs in the Department of Law and Public Safety. 
  
  c.  "Person" means corporations, companies, associations, societies, firms, partnerships and joint 
stock companies as well as individuals. 
  
  d.  "Place of entertainment" means any privately or publicly owned and operated entertainment 
facility  within  this  State,  such  as  a  theater,  stadium,  museum,  arena,  racetrack  or  other  place  where 
performances, concerts, exhibits, games or contests are held and for which an entry fee is charged. 
  
  e.  "Ticket" means any piece of paper which indicates that the bearer has paid for entry or other 
evidence which permits entry to a place of entertainment. 
  
  f.  "Ticket broker" means any person situated in and operating in this State who is involved in the 
business of reselling tickets of admission to places of entertainment and who charges a premium in excess of 
the price, plus taxes, printed on the tickets.  For the purposes of this act, the term "ticket broker" shall not 
include an individual not regularly engaged in the business of reselling tickets, who resells less than 30 tickets 
during any one‐year period, and who obtained the tickets for his own use, or the use of his family, friends, or 
acquaintances. 
  
  g.  "Resale"  means  a  sale  by  a  person  other  than  the  owner  or  operator  of  a  place  of 
entertainment or of the entertainment event or an agent of any such person. 
  J Division of Consumer Affairs 
Consumer Fraud Act 

Post:  9/2011  Page 23 

  h.  "Resell" means to offer for resale or to consummate a resale. 
  
  i.  "Digger" means a person temporarily hired for the purpose of securing tickets by intimidating a 
purchaser waiting in line to procure event tickets. 
  
  L.1983, c.135, s.1; amended 1983, c.220, s.1; 2001, c.394, s.1; 2008, c.55, s.1. 
 
56:8‐27  Requirements for ticket broker. 
  2.  No ticket broker shall engage in or continue in the business of reselling tickets for admission to 
a place of entertainment without meeting the following requirements: 
 
  a.  Owning, operating or maintaining a permanent office, branch office, bureau, agency, or other 
place of business, not including a post office box, for the purpose of reselling tickets; 
 
  b.  Obtaining a certificate of registration to resell or engage in the business of reselling tickets from 
the director; 
 
  c.  Listing the ticket broker's registration number in any form of advertisement or solicitation in 
which tickets are being sold for the purpose of purchase by the general public for events in this State; 
 
  d.  Maintaining records of ticket sales, deposits and refunds for a period of not less than two years 
from the time of any of these transactions; 
 
  e.  Disclosing to the purchaser, by means of verbal description or a map, the location of the seats 
represented by the tickets; 
 
  f.  Disclosing to the purchaser the cancellation policy of that broker; 
 
  g.  Disclosing that a service charge is added by the ticket broker to the stated price on the tickets 
and is included by the broker in any advertisement or promotion for an event; 
 
  h.  Disclosing to the purchaser, whenever applicable, that the ticket broker has a guarantee policy.  
If a ticket broker guarantees delivery of tickets to a purchaser and fails to deliver the tickets, the ticket broker 
shall provide a full refund for the cost of the tickets; 
 
  i.  Disclosing to the purchaser of tickets when he is utilizing a tentative order policy, popularly 
known as a "try and get."  When a ticket broker fails to obtain tickets on a "try and get" basis, the broker shall 
refund any deposit made by a purchaser of those tickets within a reasonable time, as shall be determined by 
the director; 
 
  j.  When guaranteeing tickets in conjunction with providing a tour package, a ticket broker who 
fails to provide a purchaser with those tickets shall refund fully the price of the tour package and tickets; and 

 

k.  Providing to a purchaser of tickets who cancels an order a full refund for the cost of the tickets 

less shipping charges, if those  tickets are returned to the broker within three days after receipt; provided, that 
when tickets are purchased within seven days of an event, a refund shall be given only if the tickets are 
returned  within  one  day  of receipt;  and  further  provided, that  no refund shall  be  given  on  any tickets 
purchased within six days of an event unless the ticket broker is able to resell the tickets. 
 
  L.1983,c.135,s.2; amended 1983, c.220, s.2; 2001, c.394, s.2. 
 
56:8‐28  Application for registration, fee. 
  3.    a.    The  division shall  prepare  and furnish to  applicants for registration  application forms  and 
requirements prescribed by the director pertaining to the applications for and the issuance of certificates of 
registration to ticket brokers. 
 
  b.  Every applicant for a certificate of registration to engage in the business of reselling tickets as a 
ticket broker shall file a written application with the division on the form furnished by, and consistent with, 
the regulations prescribed by the director. 
 
  c.  Each application shall be accompanied by a fee which shall be determined by the director and 
shall not exceed $500, and a description of the location where the applicant proposes to conduct his business. 
 
  L.1983,c.135,s.3; amended 2001, c.394, s.3. 
 
56:8‐29  Issuance of certificate of registration. 
  4.  a.  Within 120 days after receipt of the completed application, fee and bond, if any, and when the 
director is satisfied that the applicant has complied with all of the requirements of this act, the director shall 
grant and issue a certificate of registration to the applicant. 
 
  b.  The  certificate of registration granted may be renewed for a period of two years upon the 
payment of a renewal fee which shall be determined by the director and shall not exceed $500. 
 
  c.  No  certificate  of registration shall  be transferred  or  assigned  without the  approval  of the 
director.  Any request for a change in the location of the premises operated by any registrant situated in and 
operating  in this  State shall  be submitted to the  director  in  writing  no  less than  30  days  prior to that 
relocation.   The certificate of registration shall run to January 1 in the second year next ensuing the date 
thereof unless sooner revoked by the director. 
 
  L.1983,c.135,s.4; amended 2001, c.394, s.4. 
 
56:8‐30  Bond required to engage in business of reselling tickets as a ticket broker. 
  5.  The director shall require the applicant for a certificate of registration to engage in the business 
of reselling tickets as a ticket broker to file with the application a bond in the amount of $10,000.00 with two NJ Division of Consumer Affairs 
Consumer Fraud Act 

Post:  9/2011  Page 25 

or more sufficient sureties or an authorized surety company, which bond shall be approved by the director. 
 
  Each bond shall be conditioned on the promise that the applicant, his agents or employees will not be 
guilty of fraud or extortion, will not violate any of the provisions of this act, will comply with the rules and 
regulations promulgated by the director, and will pay all damages occasioned to any person by reason of 
misstatement, misrepresentation, fraud or deceit or  any unlawful  act or omission  in  connection with the 
provisions of this act and the business conducted under this act. 
 
  L.1983,c.135,s.5; amended 2001, c.394, s.5. 
 
56:8‐31.  Revocation or suspension of license 
    The director, after notice to the licensee and reasonable opportunity for the licensee to be heard, may 
revoke  his  license  or  may suspend  his  license  for    any  period  which  the  director  deems  proper,  upon 
satisfactory proof that the  licensee has violated this act, any condition of his license or any rule or  regulation 
of the division promulgated pursuant to this act. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 6. 
 
56:8‐32.  Display of license;  copies 
    Immediately upon the receipt of the  license  issued pursuant to this act, the    licensee shall display and 
maintain his license in a conspicuous place in his  principal office for reselling tickets.  He shall request copies 
of the license   from the director for the purpose of displaying a copy of the license in each   branch office, 
bureau or agency and the director may charge a fee for the  copies. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 7. 
 
56:8‐33  Price charged printed on ticket, maximum premium for reseller; exceptions. 
  
  8. a. Each place of entertainment shall print on the face of each ticket and include in any advertising for 
any event the price charged therefor. 
  
  b.  No person other than a registered ticket broker shall resell or purchase with the intent to resell 
a ticket for admission to a place of entertainment at a maximum premium in excess of 20% of the ticket price 
or $3.00, whichever is greater, plus lawful taxes. No registered ticket broker shall resell or purchase with the 
intent to resell a ticket for admission to a place of entertainment at a premium in excess of 50% of the price 
paid to acquire the ticket, plus lawful taxes. 
  
  c.  Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection a. or b. of this section, nothing shall limit the price 
for the resale or purchase of a ticket for admission to a place of entertainment sold by any person other than a 
registered ticket broker, provided such resale or purchase is made through an Internet web site. 
   L.1983, c.135, s.8; amended 1983, c.220, s.3; 2001, c.394, s.6; 2008, c.55, s.2. 
 NJ Division of Consumer Affairs 
Consumer Fraud Act 

Post:  9/2011  Page 26 

56:8‐34  Reselling tickets prohibited in certain area; exceptions. 
  9.   a.   No person shall resell or purchase with the  intent to resell any ticket,  in or on any street, 
highway, driveway, sidewalk, parking area, or common area owned by a place of entertainment in this State, 
or any other area adjacent to or in the vicinity of any place of entertainment in this State as determined by the 
director; except that a person may resell, in an area which may be designated by a place of entertainment in 
this State, any ticket or tickets originally purchased for his own personal or family use at no greater than the 
lawful price permitted under this act. 
 
  L.1983,c.135,s.9; amended 1983, c.220, s.4; 2001, c.394, s.7. 
 
56:8‐35.  Special treatment in obtaining tickets;  prohibition 
    Any person who gives or offers anything of value to an employee of a place of entertainment in exchange 
for, or as an inducement to, special treatment with respect to obtaining tickets, or any employee of a place of 
entertainment who receives or solicits anything of value in exchange for special treatment with respect to 
issuing tickets, shall be in violation of this act. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 10.  Amended by L.1983, c. 220, s. 5. 
 
56:8‐35.1  Withholding tickets from sale, prohibited amount. 
  8.  It shall be an unlawful practice for a person, who has access to tickets to an event prior to the 
tickets' release for sale to the general public, to withhold those tickets from sale to the general public in an 
amount exceeding 5% of all available seating for the event. 
 
  L.2001,c.394,s.8. 
 
56:8‐35.2  Refunds prohibited under certain circumstances. 
  9.  A purchaser of tickets who places a special order with a ticket broker for tickets that are not in 
stock or are obtained for a purchaser's specific need and are paid for in advance by the ticket broker, shall not 
be eligible to receive a refund for that purchase unless the ticket broker is able to find someone else to 
purchase the tickets and as long as the purchaser is notified in advance of this policy. 
  L.2001,c.394,s.9. 
 
56:8‐35.3  Method for lawful sell back. 
  11.  The director and places of entertainment shall create a method for season ticket holders and other 
ticket holders to lawfully sell back tickets to the venue for events they will not be able to attend. 
 
  L.2001,c.394,s.11. 
 
56:8‐35.4  Use of digger unlawful. 
  12.  It shall be an unlawful practice for a person to use a digger to acquire any ticket. 
  L.2001,c.394,s.12. 
 NJ Division of Consumer Affairs 
Consumer Fraud Act 

Post:  9/2011  Page 27 

56:8‐36.  Rules and regulations 
    The director, pursuant to the provisions of the  "Administrative Procedure Act,"  P.L.1968, c. 410 (C. 52:14B‐
1 et seq.), shall promulgate rules and regulations necessary to implement this act. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 11. 
 
56:8‐37.  Violations;  penalty 
    Any person who violates any provision of this act shall be guilty of a crime  of the fourth degree. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 12. 
 
56:8‐38.  Nonprofit or political organizations;  application of act 
    The provisions of this act shall not apply to any person who sells, raffles  or otherwise disposes of the ticket 
for a bona fide nonprofit or political   organization when the premium proceeds are devoted to the lawful 
purposes of  the organization. 
 
     L.1983, c. 135, s. 13. 

Interesting.  Thought the whole purpose of repealing the laws was to allow prices to be set by supply and demand.  At least that is what idiots like Bloomberg were saying when the scalping laws were repealed, or allegedly repealed.

 

The Giants, btw used the same tactic.  They called me before the new stadium opened and tried to sell me club seats.  PSLs of 7500 each and game tickets for 400 each.  Told him those were overpriced.  Rep also said I could sell them for as much as I wanted to get the money back.


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#137 Matteau#32

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 07:38 AM

Yeah apparently they are getting rid of the all you can eat food in the club seats.  In exchange the seats are now going to be listed at $150-180 instead of $250-280.

 

The other rumors I hear is that there will be 2 tiers:

1) $150 ticket gets you into the club and that's it.  You must pay for everything else

2) $180 ticket gets you into the club and a $30 food and beverage card.

 

 

I'd be more inclined to buy the $150s.  Why pre-pay when I don't know if I would use it all.  They would be better off doing something like $30 for a $50 food credit.  Yes, they are giving away $20, but there will be enough people who do not spend even the $30 that they will come out ahead.  Plus, the profit margin on food at games is ridiculous, so they are not actually losing any money.


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#138 Matteau#32

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 07:42 AM

One year, the Flyers were forcing people to buy food vouchers on individual tickets.  I went onto their site to buy Rangers-Flyers.  Each price point also had the option to buy a $10 food credit.  When I tried to just buy the tickets, nothing was available.  When I tried the same price point WITH the food credit, seats were available.  It was only $10, and still cheaper than buying on stubhub, but it was still dirty, imo.


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#139 Neb00rs

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 02:43 PM

Interesting.  Thought the whole purpose of repealing the laws was to allow prices to be set by supply and demand.  At least that is what idiots like Bloomberg were saying when the scalping laws were repealed, or allegedly repealed.

 

The Giants, btw used the same tactic.  They called me before the new stadium opened and tried to sell me club seats.  PSLs of 7500 each and game tickets for 400 each.  Told him those were overpriced.  Rep also said I could sell them for as much as I wanted to get the money back.

 

Clearly there is a huge amount of pressure on these call center employees (don't even ask me to call them 'reps), so I sympathize with their plight. That said, while the callers may or may not be actual employees of the team - as the call center is contracted by the team to sell the tickets, the team can be held accountable for the actions of the employees.

 

The team and cell center would argue that "it's not our policy to do that yada yada yada..." and the only thing that would come out of legal action would probably be a cessation of the tactic.

 

The point I'm making though, is that anyone with confiscated STs should be calling the organization and arguing that the team promoted a culture of resale.


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#140 ThreeCups

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 07:21 PM

Clearly there is a huge amount of pressure on these call center employees (don't even ask me to call them 'reps), so I sympathize with their plight. That said, while the callers may or may not be actual employees of the team - as the call center is contracted by the team to sell the tickets, the team can be held accountable for the actions of the employees.

 

The team and cell center would argue that "it's not our policy to do that yada yada yada..." and the only thing that would come out of legal action would probably be a cessation of the tactic.

 

The point I'm making though, is that anyone with confiscated STs should be calling the organization and arguing that the team promoted a culture of resale.

 

 

There is no outsourcing, or "call center"

 

These are in fact DEVILS employees calling FROM Prudential Center....which makes this practice that much worse IMO.....


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