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Angels fly with a Devil --- Scott Gomez


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#1 aylbert

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 07:26 AM

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I tried looking for a print article and couldnt find it. I tried scaling the scan back for easier loading.
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#2 elias2600

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 11:24 AM

no mention of how many times he puked??
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#3 Sockeye

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 11:53 AM

Here is a print article. From the sounds of it he may have blacked out?

http://www.ktuu.com/....asp?a=5987&z=1

Seeing the heavens and stars with the Blue Angels
Thursday, August 10, 2006 - by John Tracy • Watch the video...

Anchorage, Alaska - You may have noticed a lot of thunder over the city late this afternoon. If nothing else, you heard them. They are the U.S. Navy Blue Angels demonstration team, and they're headlining this weekend's Arctic Thunder air show at Elmendorf Air Force Base. But while most of us admire them from the ground, every visit a lucky few get to ride with the Angels.

The Blue Angels are a combination of power and precision, and now they're celebrating their 60th anniversary. For the past two decades, they have pushed the F-18 Hornet to its limits, with high-speed maneuvers where success is measured in inches.

The Angels have a lot of traditions, and allowing civilians to ride along is one of them. Scott Gomez of the National Hockey League’s New Jersey Devils will become a Blue Angel for a day. He'll be joined by me, KTUU-TV’s John Tracy, and Bob Lester. Lester is the Bob of the “Bob and Mark Morning Show” on KWHL radio.

Before any of us ride, we must be briefed by the crew chief of Angel No. 7, Patrick Palma. On our ride today, we'll travel just under the speed of sound and burn $3,000 worth of fuel. But for some reason, all we can think about is our stomachs.

“Fifty percent of the people that do this ride with us get sick, and 66 percent actually pass out,” said Palma (right).

“What a waste of $3,000,” Lester said.

Lt. Kevin Davis was the pilot of the flights, and he's also known as the voice of the Blue Angels. Davis goes by the nickname “Seven,” for obvious reasons, or “Kojak,” for reasons he won't explain. He's been flying Navy fighters for 10 years, with more than 200 carrier landings under his belt. You don't sit in an F-15 as much as you're strapped to it.

Today's flight will be 45 minutes, and there's not a dull moment. The F-18 climbs 500 feet per second, and in 20 seconds, it reaches an altitude of 10,000 feet.

Today, Scott Gomez, flight name “Gomer,” will experience some of the maneuvers the Blue Angels perform, such as the loop. The first stunts are relatively tame, but it doesn't stay that way. The Himmelman is an old World War I dogfight maneuver.

When the plane reaches 7.7 Gs, it's like setting 1,700 pounds worth of weight on top of you. The only way to keep from blacking out is to squeeze your muscles and try to keep the blood from rushing to your toes.

Gomer’s flight is flawless: no air sick bag and no blackout. That is, until they reach the airfield. Without realizing it, Gomez takes a snooze. Back on the ground, Seven gives Gomez an almost perfect 10.

“He might have just seen a lot of gray, maybe a little bit of black on the recovery maneuver back to the field, but really did solid. One of the best riders I've had,” said Davis (right).

And then for Gomez, the post-flight interview awaits.

“So what's more exciting: winning the Stanley Cup or flying in one of those?” Lester said.

“This is right up there. It's a special thing. I mean, the takeoff, everything, it's pretty crazy,” Gomez said.


Next up is Bob Lester, nickname: “Jester.” Right about now, the last-minute bag of peanuts is not sounding like such a good idea. But like Gomer, Jester has an iron stomach, and like Gomez, he stays awake almost the entire flight.

Almost. One last 7.5 G turn and then Lester is off the air.

“It all goes kind of gray,” Lester said. “Couple times it went gray, and then it came back, and it was like, OK, I made it.’ Then the last one, it just kind of went geeewhoop, and I was like, ‘Oh, I'm passed out right now. I passed out, didn't I? I did.’ Then you come back and he’s going, ‘Buddy, you with me?’ And I'm going, ‘D’oh, I passed out.’”

I will be the last to fly, but that's another story. I'll just say if Jester earned his nickname, so did I. You can just call me “Chuck.”

The Blue Angels are just one of 20 performing groups at this year's Arctic Thunder air show. The Boniface Parkway gates open to the public at 8 a.m., while the show starts at 10. Shuttle busses will also run from East and Bartlett high schools, as well as Fort Richardson.
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#4 sandman441

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 03:05 PM

I tried looking for a print article and couldnt find it. I tried scaling the scan back for easier loading.



You didn't find it because it wasnt' in the times it was the Anchorage Daily News. The times went out of business or left in I think around '92.
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#5 aylbert

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 03:29 PM

LOL, I was lied to then... lol
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#6 sandman441

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 03:55 PM

LOL, I was lied to then... lol



Yeah or whoever it was didn't know.
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