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Bhutto Assassinated


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#1 njdevil26

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 02:30 PM

Third attempt to kill her since she arrived back in Pakistan on Oct 17th, you'd think she'd have left.


http://www.cnn.com/S...utto/index.html
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#2 Jimmy Leeds

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 03:01 PM

Very,very sad day.
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#3 Super 17

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 03:15 PM

It was going to happen eventually :(
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#4 njdevil26

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 03:16 PM

I honestly think Musharraf played a large part in this... she was coming back to work with him and get him to relinquish his military role in the government. NO WAY he was going to do that...
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#5 LetsGoDevils

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 03:59 PM

A sad day for her people. RIP
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#6 metallidevils

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 08:38 PM

RIP, but I'm probably the only one here to have never heard of her.
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#7 Nature's Minister

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 08:40 PM

I don't think Musharref had anything to do with it, to be honest.

This could destabilize his position in government.
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#8 point

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 12:29 PM

B Bhutto wasn't exactly Princess Diana. It wasn't very long ago that no one in Washington DC would be caught dead in the same bus with her. (pardon the expression.) I have a very big problem with the US trying to run other countries' democracies. It comes out that we just back one dictator after another. In 3-4 years, she probably would have turned out just like Musharaff has. Heck, she already did it once before, as her father did.

All the same, it is a sad day for the people of Pakistan.
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#9 South Jersey Devs Fan

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 03:46 PM

I don't know enough about her history to have a comment of any value other than thanking God I'm an American. We should all be more grateful for the freedom and stability we have here. Our country has some issues but is still the greatest.
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#10 Pepperkorn

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 10:23 PM

I don't think Musharref had anything to do with it, to be honest.

This could destabilize his position in government.


I agree, that would be the logical conclusion -- but logic just never seems to play apart in government. BUT Musharref has been pretty logical (in a self-serving sense, sure) in all his dealings thus far
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#11 Jimmy Leeds

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 09:48 AM

I don't know enough about her history to have a comment of any value other than thanking God I'm an American. We should all be more grateful for the freedom and stability we have here. Our country has some issues but is still the greatest.

Some of our resident lefty loons may take issue with your "flag waving"
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#12 Comandante

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 05:12 PM

The "ppp" lost a very important person.. :(
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#13 oofrostonoo

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 05:24 PM

Some of our resident lefty loons may take issue with your "flag waving"

Lefty loons...haha your like a real life Bill O'Reilly.

Objectivity.
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#14 Camden28

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 05:54 PM

In yesterday’s Washington Post, respected Pakistan analyst Ahmed Rashid explained a key problem with current U.S. policy:

The problem is exacerbated by a dramatic drop-off in U.S. expertise on Pakistan. Retired American officials say that, for the first time in U.S. history, nobody with serious Pakistan experience is working in the South Asia bureau of the State Department, on State’s policy planning staff, on the National Security Council staff or even in Vice President Cheney’s office. Anne W. Patterson, the new U.S. ambassador to Islamabad, is an expert on Latin American “drugs and thugs”; Richard A. Boucher, the assistant secretary of state for South and Central Asian affairs, is a former department spokesman who served three tours in Hong Kong and China but never was posted in South Asia. “They know nothing of Pakistan,” a former senior U.S. diplomat said.

Current and past U.S. officials tell me that Pakistan policy is essentially being run from Cheney’s office. The vice president, they say, is close to Musharraf and refuses to brook any U.S. criticism of him. This all fits; in recent months, I’m told, Pakistani opposition politicians visiting Washington have been ushered in to meet Cheney’s aides, rather than taken to the State Department.

Cheney’s office has been linked to some of the most damaging and reckless policies carried out under President Bush, including the origins of the war in the Iraq, warrantless domestic spying, the historic expansion of executive authority and the sanctioning of torture. It’s no surprise to find Cheney’s fingerprints on the failing U.S.-Pakistan policy as well.
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#15 Jimmy Leeds

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 08:49 PM

In yesterday’s Washington Post, respected Pakistan analyst Ahmed Rashid explained a key problem with current U.S. policy:

The problem is exacerbated by a dramatic drop-off in U.S. expertise on Pakistan. Retired American officials say that, for the first time in U.S. history, nobody with serious Pakistan experience is working in the South Asia bureau of the State Department, on State’s policy planning staff, on the National Security Council staff or even in Vice President Cheney’s office. Anne W. Patterson, the new U.S. ambassador to Islamabad, is an expert on Latin American “drugs and thugs”; Richard A. Boucher, the assistant secretary of state for South and Central Asian affairs, is a former department spokesman who served three tours in Hong Kong and China but never was posted in South Asia. “They know nothing of Pakistan,” a former senior U.S. diplomat said.

Current and past U.S. officials tell me that Pakistan policy is essentially being run from Cheney’s office. The vice president, they say, is close to Musharraf and refuses to brook any U.S. criticism of him. This all fits; in recent months, I’m told, Pakistani opposition politicians visiting Washington have been ushered in to meet Cheney’s aides, rather than taken to the State Department.

Cheney’s office has been linked to some of the most damaging and reckless policies carried out under President Bush, including the origins of the war in the Iraq, warrantless domestic spying, the historic expansion of executive authority and the sanctioning of torture. It’s no surprise to find Cheney’s fingerprints on the failing U.S.-Pakistan policy as well.

Another loony left hatchet job pumped up by zanies like Camden28.

Bitter much?
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#16 LetsGoDevils

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 02:46 PM

Wait....I thought is was Rove's fault :doh1:
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#17 LOULAM1

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 08:52 PM

Wait....I thought is was Rove's fault :doh1:


Britney is Rove's fault!

"Current and past U.S. officials tell me that Pakistan policy is essentially being run from Cheney’s office." WHO THE HELL ARE THE CURRENT AND PAST U.S. OFFICIALS?!

It's actually quite funny that this punk can't name a source.

Edited by LOULAM1, 04 January 2008 - 08:53 PM.

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#18 SteveStevens

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 04:05 PM

Another loony left hatchet job pumped up by zanies like Camden28.

Bitter much?


I dont consider myself too liberal or conservative but why do you have such problems with people expressing what they feel about certain topics?
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#19 Beetlebum

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 12:14 AM

unfortunately we played a big role in facilitating the assassination. we were the main actors in negotiating bhutto return to pakistan. since the us government felt she would do a better job going after al qaeda in the tribal regions in pakistan. second, we have been propping up a military dictator that is not popularly elected. while he does benefit our interests in the short term this will wind up turning into a disaster. we are radicalizing a country that previously did not have a large extremist population. in fact if a popular and free election was called tomorrow a hamas like result would not occur.
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#20 Jimmy Leeds

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 12:23 AM

It's America's fault..........see above post.

I dont consider myself too liberal or conservative but why do you have such problems with people expressing what they feel about certain topics?

'cause Camden28 is a liberal hatchet lady. She is a far left kook who attacks me at all times and I don't care for her kind.
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