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Camden28

Member Since 04 Jan 2007
Offline Last Active May 13 2008 08:11 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Study finds 935 false statements on Iraq

24 January 2008 - 12:05 PM

No, Soros funds these radicals who distort to try and create an America no one here would recognize. Sheep like Manta, PeteyN, and Camden can't see through this fog.

Funny, they don't link to all the Dems who said Saddam had weapons, etc.

Not worth the paper it's written on. Funny how we instituted a "Newsmax" rule, but our resident loons can post any garbage they wish.

http://www.snopes.co...r/wmdquotes.asp



Keeping your head in the sand isn't a solution. Ignoring reality because you can't accept it is probably why your so bitter to begin with.

In Topic: Study finds 935 false statements on Iraq

23 January 2008 - 12:13 PM

It WAS the lead story on Yahoo news an hour ago, but mysteriously has buried to the end of the features story list.

http://news.yahoo.co...bcMWAPzhEmyFz4D

In Topic: Bhutto Assassinated

03 January 2008 - 05:54 PM

In yesterday’s Washington Post, respected Pakistan analyst Ahmed Rashid explained a key problem with current U.S. policy:

The problem is exacerbated by a dramatic drop-off in U.S. expertise on Pakistan. Retired American officials say that, for the first time in U.S. history, nobody with serious Pakistan experience is working in the South Asia bureau of the State Department, on State’s policy planning staff, on the National Security Council staff or even in Vice President Cheney’s office. Anne W. Patterson, the new U.S. ambassador to Islamabad, is an expert on Latin American “drugs and thugs”; Richard A. Boucher, the assistant secretary of state for South and Central Asian affairs, is a former department spokesman who served three tours in Hong Kong and China but never was posted in South Asia. “They know nothing of Pakistan,” a former senior U.S. diplomat said.

Current and past U.S. officials tell me that Pakistan policy is essentially being run from Cheney’s office. The vice president, they say, is close to Musharraf and refuses to brook any U.S. criticism of him. This all fits; in recent months, I’m told, Pakistani opposition politicians visiting Washington have been ushered in to meet Cheney’s aides, rather than taken to the State Department.

Cheney’s office has been linked to some of the most damaging and reckless policies carried out under President Bush, including the origins of the war in the Iraq, warrantless domestic spying, the historic expansion of executive authority and the sanctioning of torture. It’s no surprise to find Cheney’s fingerprints on the failing U.S.-Pakistan policy as well.

In Topic: NJ Death Penalty

20 December 2007 - 04:03 PM

Plus, its a great way to keep American wages down and corporate profits up!!!

In Topic: NJ Death Penalty

20 December 2007 - 12:25 PM

Prisons are BIG business and more and more convicts are becoming corporate slave/cheap labor. Manufacturing and service jobs are being cut so that prisoners now take your airline reservations and make your clothes.

There are presently 80,000 inmates in the US employed in commercial activity, some earning as little as 21 cents an hour.

The US government program Federal Prison Industries (FPI) currently employs 21,000 inmates, an increase of 14 percent in the last two years alone. FPI inmates make a wide variety of products—such as clothing, file cabinets, electronic equipment and military helmets—which are sold to federal agencies and private companies. FPI sales are $600 million annually and rising, with over $37 million in profits.

In addition, during the last 20 years more than 30 states have passed laws permitting the use of convict labor by commercial enterprises. These programs now exist in 36 states.

Prisoners now manufacture everything from blue jeans, to auto parts, to electronics and furniture. Honda has paid inmates $2 an hour for doing the same work an auto worker would get paid $20 to $30 an hour to do. Konica has used prisoners to repair copiers for less than 50 cents an hour. Toys R Us used prisoners to restock shelves, and Microsoft to pack and ship software. Clothing made in California and Oregon prisons competes so successfully with apparel made in Latin America and Asia that it is exported to other countries.
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