Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
LittleBallofHate

2018-19 Prospects Thread

Recommended Posts

Pretty sure I’ve heard Dano say the same thing about not knowing where NJ was when he got drafted. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Colorado Rockies 1976 said:

Lappin now has 35 goals in 69 games with Bingo, from the start of last season (58 points).  Looks like he's going to be one of those "AAAA" players that can put up nice numbers in the AHL, but won't see that translate to the NHL.  He'll be 26 on 11/1. 

If this were 2014 or 2015, I think he's on the team.  I think he could turn into a fine 4th liner and maybe even a 3rd liner on some teams that might be lacking depth.  I just don't think we have the room for him.  Good problem to have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, NJDevils1214 said:

I liked geography in school, but I only had geography class one year and we spent more time learning about India and the Middle East than about Canada. Before that, it was lumped in with social studies and after that year I had Civics then it became history(world, US, etc). 

Edit: To my surprise I just took a shot at the Provences and only missed 2. I still don't think I'd ever have known where Missasauga was. 

Geography, to this day, is largely ignored or glossed over in most school's curriculum.  Not exactly sure why, but I am assuming it is because it is still not really tested on any of the standardized tests.  It should be taught a little more thoroughly and for the entire world.  I mean, how much more embarrassing could it be that our own citizens can't even state basic locations/facts about our neighboring countries and even our own country.

With the world becoming seemingly smaller due to advancing technology, you would think this would be a higher priority.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, DevsMan84 said:

Geography, to this day, is largely ignored or glossed over in most school's curriculum.  Not exactly sure why, but I am assuming it is because it is still not really tested on any of the standardized tests.  It should be taught a little more thoroughly and for the entire world.  I mean, how much more embarrassing could it be that our own citizens can't even state basic locations/facts about our neighboring countries and even our own country.

With the world becoming seemingly smaller due to advancing technology, you would think this would be a higher priority.

Speaking my language, I agree 100%! During 6th grade, my seat was at the back of the class (we stayed in the same classroom all day, think they were doing construction), and sat right next to a huge world map. I was pretty bright and doing well in most classes, so I'd kind of space out and study the map for hours; I can name like 95% of the world's capitals haha on top of that, my favorite computer game at the time (and still) was Civilization. How I didn't become a historian or social studies teacher, I'll never know, but it was definitely my favorite. 

I know we're way off topic, but I agree it should be prioritized again. My family and friends in Italy could name the 50 states and all state capitals, but you ask the average American where South Dakota is on the map, and most will get it wrong (and 30% do not know who the Vice President is). I won't get too deep into politics, but maybe we wouldn't be in some of the situations we're in overseas if more Americans even had the most rudimentary understanding of the Middle East or the Koreas or Russia, etc., but that's asking a lot. People don't really understand, so they're susceptible to buying whatever special interest garbage our crooked politicians (on both sides) are selling. But that's all I'll say about that lol

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DJ Eco said:

Speaking my language, I agree 100%! During 6th grade, my seat was at the back of the class (we stayed in the same classroom all day, think they were doing construction), and sat right next to a huge world map. I was pretty bright and doing well in most classes, so I'd kind of space out and study the map for hours; I can name like 95% of the world's capitals haha on top of that, my favorite computer game at the time (and still) was Civilization. How I didn't become a historian or social studies teacher, I'll never know, but it was definitely my favorite. 

I know we're way off topic, but I agree it should be prioritized again. My family and friends in Italy could name the 50 states and all state capitals, but you ask the average American where South Dakota is on the map, and most will get it wrong (and 30% do not know who the Vice President is). I won't get too deep into politics, but maybe we wouldn't be in some of the situations we're in overseas if more Americans even had the most rudimentary understanding of the Middle East or the Koreas or Russia, etc., but that's asking a lot. People don't really understand, so they're susceptible to buying whatever special interest garbage our crooked politicians (on both sides) are selling. But that's all I'll say about that lol

Despite the impression left on you by your friends and family in Italy, Americans, on average, are probably more or less as ignorant as your average Italian, Frenchman, German, etc.  The much more important thing is for people to recognize that they're ignorant about almost everything outside of what they know really well.  It's also important to realize that people's ignorance of the things that get talked about on social media  doesn't matter all that much.  You can be certain that the sun revolves around the earth and still be a perfectly competent lawyer, electrician, funeral director, Marine Corps drill instructor, etc.  Neal Degrasse Tyson likes to lament how Americans don't know that much about science, but an average American probably knows more about the tax code and Constitution than he does (not very much to begin with, but still more), which is much more important for being an informed citizen.

To get back on topic, Jeremy Davies continues to be a very intriguing prospect.  He started college a s 19.5 year old and has been pretty much a point per game player since his sophomore year playing against good competition.  Seems similar to Tory Krug.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Prospects updates - right now I just AATJ - I will edit this later with the Reddit link if/when it gets posted: 

https://www.allaboutthejersey.com/2018/10/23/18011818/new-jersey-devils-prospect-update-10-23-18

 

Also, since Bing lost both games (4-0) since my last update, I'm not going to do a new post. If you feel like reading about the games/who played/etc, here are the gamesheets: 

Oct 19, Syracuse @ Bing: https://lscluster.hockeytech.com/game_reports/official-game-report.php?client_code=ahl&game_id=1018408&lang_id=1

Oct 20, Cleveland @ Bing: https://lscluster.hockeytech.com/game_reports/official-game-report.php?client_code=ahl&game_id=1018421&lang_id=1

Next game is tomorrow (Wed), playing the baby Sens.  Schneids is supposed to get the start in net again. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/16/2018 at 11:41 AM, Daniel said:

Despite the impression left on you by your friends and family in Italy, Americans, on average, are probably more or less as ignorant as your average Italian, Frenchman, German, etc.  The much more important thing is for people to recognize that they're ignorant about almost everything outside of what they know really well.  It's also important to realize that people's ignorance of the things that get talked about on social media  doesn't matter all that much.  You can be certain that the sun revolves around the earth and still be a perfectly competent lawyer, electrician, funeral director, Marine Corps drill instructor, etc.  Neal Degrasse Tyson likes to lament how Americans don't know that much about science, but an average American probably knows more about the tax code and Constitution than he does (not very much to begin with, but still more), which is much more important for being an informed citizen.

To get back on topic, Jeremy Davies continues to be a very intriguing prospect.  He started college a s 19.5 year old and has been pretty much a point per game player since his sophomore year playing against good competition.  Seems similar to Tory Krug.

Sorry to bring this off-topic again but just saw this.  Year after year American students still are behind on geography skills than students in other westernized countries.  This is not by a little either, but by a decent margin.

I agree there are things that we are taught as students that really do apply any practical use towards what we eventually end up doing for work in our lives.  However, I do think there are some priorities that are a little out of whack in our country.  Would it be more advantageous to a vast majority of Americans to know where the hell they are or where countries are located or all the details regarding the Krebs Cycle?  I learned both of those in grade school and we spent more time on one than the other.  Take a guess which one we spent more time on.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, DevsMan84 said:

Sorry to bring this off-topic again but just saw this.  Year after year American students still are behind on geography skills than students in other westernized countries.  This is not by a little either, but by a decent margin.

I agree there are things that we are taught as students that really do apply any practical use towards what we eventually end up doing for work in our lives.  However, I do think there are some priorities that are a little out of whack in our country.  Would it be more advantageous to a vast majority of Americans to know where the hell they are or where countries are located or all the details regarding the Krebs Cycle?  I learned both of those in grade school and we spent more time on one than the other.  Take a guess which one we spent more time on.

If people don’t know basic stuff, it isn’t for lack of it being taught in school, for the most part anyway.  It almost entirely has to do with those people being predisposed not to be able to absorb the material or not to remember it if they actually learned it at some point.  Not much anyone can do about it, except we can realize that we can’t make all people above average intellectually and attempt to figure out things accordingly. 

And Jeremy Davies supposedly has an injury of some sort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Daniel said:

If people don’t know basic stuff, it isn’t for lack of it being taught in school, for the most part anyway.  It almost entirely has to do with those people being predisposed not to be able to absorb the material or not to remember it if they actually learned it at some point.  Not much anyone can do about it, except we can realize that we can’t make all people above average intellectually and attempt to figure out things accordingly. 

And Jeremy Davies supposedly has an injury of some sort.

I see what you are saying and I understand your point.  My point is that I think our education system is wonky when more time is spent teaching "niche" subjects rather than basics.  Outside of those who eventually get into medicine or biology, I really don't know anyone who has any practical use for knowing the ins and outs of the Krebs cycle.  FWIW we spent about 2 weeks learning about it while we spent 1 week learning geography.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

16 points in 10 GP for Smith this season.  Now 89 points in his last 79 WHL regular season games (and he's a +50 to boot).  Difficult to know how to read these numbers of course...especially since it's obvious that he's outgrown the WHL.  Will be fun to see how big his numbers can get...depending on how many games he plays (right now he can max out at 70, as he's missed two games so far), he has a shot at 100 points...if he were to play every game, he's currently on pace for 112. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Colorado Rockies 1976 said:

16 points in 10 GP for Smith this season.  Now 89 points in his last 79 WHL regular season games (and he's a +50 to boot).  Difficult to know how to read these numbers of course...especially since it's obvious that he's outgrown the WHL.  Will be fun to see how big his numbers can get...depending on how many games he plays (right now he can max out at 70, as he's missed two games so far), he has a shot at 100 points...if he were to play every game, he's currently on pace for 112. 

How common is 100 points for a defenseman in the WHL?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Nicomo said:

How common is 100 points for a defenseman in the WHL?

Last guy to do it was Shane Peacock, with 102 points in the 1992-93 season.  Looks like WHL defensemen have been topping out at 70-80 points in recent seasons. 

BTW Peacock was drafted in the 3rd round (60th overall) by the Penguins in the 1991...played exactly zero games in the NHL (did spend several years in the Deutsche Eishockey League though...played 13 seasons there for 7 different teams). 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Nicomo said:

How common is 100 points for a defenseman in the WHL?

I remember Ryan Ellis having a 101 point season in 2010-2011. Although that was in the OHL

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1990-91 was an especially bloated year in the W...some very recognizable names among the scoring leaders that year (teammates Pat Falloon and Ray Whitney, among others):

https://www.quanthockey.com/whl/en/seasons/1990-91-whl-players-stats.html

#6 on that list was F Jason Miller...wound up becoming a first-round pick of the Devils...played a whopping 6 NHL games over three seasons, all as a Devil (0 G and 0 A).  I remember him, mostly because he was a guy who was supposed to help fairly quickly, but it just never happened for him.  I remember him getting pissed about someone saying that "he hasn't done anything"...well, he never would.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Colorado Rockies 1976 said:

16 points in 10 GP for Smith this season.  Now 89 points in his last 79 WHL regular season games (and he's a +50 to boot).  Difficult to know how to read these numbers of course...especially since it's obvious that he's outgrown the WHL.  Will be fun to see how big his numbers can get...depending on how many games he plays (right now he can max out at 70, as he's missed two games so far), he has a shot at 100 points...if he were to play every game, he's currently on pace for 112. 

I imagine he'll probably make the Canada U20 team, which will make it very difficult to get to 100 points.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Colorado Rockies 1976 said:

1990-91 was an especially bloated year in the W...some very recognizable names among the scoring leaders that year (teammates Pat Falloon and Ray Whitney, among others):

https://www.quanthockey.com/whl/en/seasons/1990-91-whl-players-stats.html

#6 on that list was F Jason Miller...wound up becoming a first-round pick of the Devils...played a whopping 6 NHL games over three seasons, all as a Devil (0 G and 0 A).  I remember him, mostly because he was a guy who was supposed to help fairly quickly, but it just never happened for him.  I remember him getting pissed about someone saying that "he hasn't done anything"...well, he never would.

 

Damn.  Ray "Quietest 1000-point player in NHL history" Whitney.  Also, like you said a few other notables.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, DevsMan84 said:

Damn.  Ray "Quietest 1000-point player in NHL history" Whitney.  Also, like you said a few other notables.

Yeah, was really the ultimate compiler...he just kind of stubbornly kept on playing...was always just a bit under the radar, but then you look up and he's played in 1330 games and put up 1064 points.  Guy averaged a tick over 70 points per 82 GP from 1997-2013 (1061 GP, 911 points), but somehow he just never seemed to get much attention.  He averaged 0.8 points per game for his career...Elias was at 0.827.  Not saying that he was as good as Elias, just that it's funny how some guys just don't get much attention at all (Whitney also played for 8 teams, and never more than 372 games with any one team). 

23 minutes ago, Daniel said:

I imagine he'll probably make the Canada U20 team, which will make it very difficult to get to 100 points.

I'd actually be surprised if he ever got to 100 points, in spite of what I posted...I wrote that before checking back over the years and seeing that a defenseman hadn't pulled off the feat in quite some time.  And yeah, to have any shot at all, he wouldn't be able to miss too many WHL games. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Colorado Rockies 1976 said:

 

I'd actually be surprised if he ever got to 100 points, in spite of what I posted...I wrote that before checking back over the years and seeing that a defenseman hadn't pulled off the feat in quite some time.  And yeah, to have any shot at all, he wouldn't be able to miss too many WHL games. 

It looks like Ryan Ellis was at the World Juniors too when he got exactly 100 points in 58 games in his D+2 year.  Ellis was in the OHL, but it really only seems that guys in the Q end up with inflated offensive stats relative to the other leagues, but even that might be wrong. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Colorado Rockies 1976 said:

Yeah, was really the ultimate compiler...

This is my favorite slight that we throw at guys. "He's a compiler, all he ever did was play a really long time and consistently put up points. What a loser". 

;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, mfitz804 said:

This is my favorite slight that we throw at guys. "He's a compiler, all he ever did was play a really long time and consistently put up points. What a loser". 

;)

Actually I have a quite a lot of respect for compilers.  There's something to be said for being consistently decent to pretty good for a long long time.  Not everyone is born to be a star or superstar.  Whitney played from the time he was 19 up until he was almost 42...all of 54 players in NHL history have played more regular season games than him.  I consider that a HELL of an achievement. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Colorado Rockies 1976 said:

Actually I have a quite a lot of respect for compilers.  There's something to be said for being consistently decent to pretty good for a long long time.  Not everyone is born to be a star or superstar.  Whitney played from the time he was 19 up until he was almost 42...all of 54 players in NHL history have played more regular season games than him.  I consider that a HELL of an achievement. 

Exactly. What the hell else should he do, he can't just "be better", he can just score as much as he can. It's not like he's going to have an open net to shoot ant but decline to do so to avoid being a compiler. 

Whitney averaged 0.8 points per game in his career, so an average of 65.6 per 82 games. Over a 23 year career. That's pretty impressive. In today's NHL, having 1-2 65 point guys in addition to your 1-2 stars is probably a guaranteed playoff berth. 

0.8 makes Whitney #180 in NHL history in points per game. I just reviewed the top 250 PPG guys in history and found the following interesting: 

Other notables just below 0.8 are Joe Pavelski, Vincent Lecavalier, Marian Gaborik, Zach Parise, both Sedins (of course its both) and Rod Brind'Amour.

Other notables just above 0.8 include some big names, Patrik Elias, Peter Bondra, Phil Housley, Kevin Stevens, Rick Tocchet, Jerome Iginla, Neal Broten, Eric Staal and John LeClair. 

And for good measure the following people have a lower PPG than Whitney, and are also in the Hall of Fame: Mark Howe, Ted Lindsay, Nels Stewart, Dave Keon, Bill Mosienko. Sad Howe, Larry Murphy, Milt Schmidt, Niklas Lidstrom. 

i also just read that only 86 players in NHL history have scored 1,000 points, though I don't know if that is up to date. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, mfitz804 said:

Exactly. What the hell else should he do, he can't just "be better", he can just score as much as he can. It's not like he's going to have an open net to shoot ant but decline to do so to avoid being a compiler. 

Whitney averaged 0.8 points per game in his career, so an average of 65.6 per 82 games. Over a 23 year career. That's pretty impressive. In today's NHL, having 1-2 65 point guys in addition to your 1-2 stars is probably a guaranteed playoff berth. 

0.8 makes Whitney #180 in NHL history in points per game. I just reviewed the top 250 PPG guys in history and found the following interesting: 

Other notables just below 0.8 are Joe Pavelski, Vincent Lecavalier, Marian Gaborik, Zach Parise, both Sedins (of course its both) and Rod Brind'Amour.

Other notables just above 0.8 include some big names, Patrik Elias, Peter Bondra, Phil Housley, Kevin Stevens, Rick Tocchet, Jerome Iginla, Neal Broten, Eric Staal and John LeClair. 

And for good measure the following people have a lower PPG than Whitney, and are also in the Hall of Fame: Mark Howe, Ted Lindsay, Nels Stewart, Dave Keon, Bill Mosienko. Sad Howe, Larry Murphy, Milt Schmidt, Niklas Lidstrom. 

i also just read that only 86 players in NHL history have scored 1,000 points, though I don't know if that is up to date. 

To be fair, a lot of the bolded are D-men while Whitney was a forward.

Whitney is just one of those guys who consistently put up good to very good numbers each year, just never was a star or had that one or more monster seasons.  Nothing wrong with that but I think he is a fringe HHOF at best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.