Jump to content

Bringing Cameras to The Rock


PattyElias26
 Share

Recommended Posts

What size camera are you allowed to bring in? Can I bring my Nikon D60 or will they not let me in? Thanks in advance

The official rule is, I believe, nothing with a removable lens.. So technically you can't but it seems like it really depends on who is checking your bag.. I'm hoping to get my D90 in next Saturday

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it's a professional camera I don't think it will be allowed. From the fan guide:

"Small, non-professional still cameras may be brought

into Prudential Center. Please note that for certain events

cameras may not be allowed into the arena. Video, audio,

and professional camera and recording devices are

prohibited. Fans may not reproduce any film, digital, video

or audio recording for commercial purposes without

the express written consent of Prudential Center."

Check out the prudential center fan guide... http://www.prucenter.com/default.asp?prucenter=139&urlkeyword=Fan_Guide

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your D60 is fine... they prohibit professional cameras.

The general rule is removable lenses might raise a flag... but if you don't really present it as such, its not going to cause an issue... its just a higher end consumer camera really.

I think the spirit is to prevent professional photographers coming to take pics with their 5-10k+ cameras

Edited by aylbert
Link to comment
Share on other sites

being in the business, the D60 is not a professional camera... but they will not allow a camera that has detachable lenses in.

http://store.uniquephoto.com/e/index.php/canon-powershot-g11-digital-camera-3632b001.html

you can get in with this and take great pics

I don't think my D90 is professional either but it's gotta be damn near close for what I paid..

msweet I love salesmanship :cheers:

How is Unique Photo's summer internship program? :D

Edited by Colin226
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on the people checking. Sometimes they don't give it a second look. I've brought my D50 in. Once with the lens off the body. My daughter brought it in her bag the body with the lens opening cap on and with the lens in a black pouch. They asked what the object was and she said the lens for the camera. They let her in. Of course it was the 55-200 mm kit lens it is not much bigger than a typical SLR lens. I'm a little nervous to bring in my 70-300mm, as it is bigger in size.

Last night(Vs. Pittsburgh 3/12/10) I saw maybe 3 DSLR cameras around me. They didn't appear to have too big a lens on them, maybe 100 or 150 mm max.

I think if you know the rule about "professional" cameras, you should be fine if questioned.

At CAA the guy next to me tried to bring his in, they denied him entry, but he went to another entrance and got in.

Edited by Rock
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember posting a question about this back in Jan or Dec, and the responses made it seem worth trying, so I brought my D90 with me to the game vs. the Stars, and didn't have a problem. Although, I did have a prime lens attached, and carried my zoom(55-200mm) in my jacket pocket. But I have a feeling the zoom wouldn't have been a huge problem. No arena worker tried to stop my when I switched lenses later, or was taking pictures using it during warmups.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What size camera are you allowed to bring in? Can I bring my Nikon D60 or will they not let me in? Thanks in advance

I brought in my Nikon D60 with both the normal lens and the 300mm zoom lens. It was in the black and yellow trimmed Nikon bag they sell the D60 with as a kit. It raised no flags and there was not one issue.

Plus my wife got AWESOME pictures :cheers:

You'll be fine :gd:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have boxes and boxes of slides I took at the old Brendan Byrne/Meadowlands from 1983-2003, I should really start scanning them. Me, my Canon FN1 (remember those MSweet?) and a prime 2.8 450mm lens. Never once was I stopped or questioned by security with it either.

Edited by Deke
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't speak for the Rock, but I travel a lot for business and have been to 5 NHL games in five different rinks this year with my Canon 7D and/or Rebel. I've never been stopped or had any problems. I just kept it in my hand with a short lens, then put the telephoto lens in my pocket. Nashville, Detroit, Dallas, Atlanta, and LA were the cities. Some suggestions (unsolicited, I know):

1) If you have short prime lens, like the Canon 50mm 1.8. I suggest having that on your camera when you walk in. It's a short lens, and not very professional "looking". You can also use it during warm ups to take shots in tight. Your best pictures will probably come from warm-ups. The players aren't moving as fast, and they go in predictable patterns - this will help you get set up easier.

2) Rent a lens. Lensrentals.com runs a GREAT service, and you can usually rent a lens for a week at a fair price. I own a 55-250, 15-85, 50mm, and 60mm prime. I've rented 100-400 for birds, air shows, etc. I've also rented some other lenses for weddings and sports. It's affordable, and might be the difference between gettign a great shot, and having just okay results. For -hockey, you don't need as much focal length as you do high ISO and/or fast lenses.

3) Get to the game early - if you can, try to be one of the first people in. If they thwart you, you'll have time to run to your car (or locker at the train station) and ditch the lens. If they don't you can get down to warm-ups and get some great shots pre-game.

4) If you are on the glass, you are going to want a short lens. I shot a ton of pictures in Nashville with my 50mm behind the net and they came out great.

5) Know your settings - practice before warm-ups to get a feel for the light. Don't waste your time on "P" or auto-mode. Start with ISO 800, and your widest aperture by setting your camera to "Av" mode. Take pictures of different places on the ice - look at your shutter speed. Anything less than 1/300th on a moving player is going to be just so-so. If you can hit 1/250 to 1/320th with ISO 800, keep it there. I set my camera to ISO 800, 1/250th, and F4.0 in Nashville and they were pretty good (not great). I only had my rebel, and ISO 1600 is not the best - on the other hand, if you have to, go to ISO 1600 before you go with slower shutter speeds.

6) If you have to shoot through the lexan (glass), get as close as you can. It will make your images "soft", but it won't necessarily ruin them. In Nashville, I had seats behind the net about 10 rows back, and I was able to shoot through the glass to the other side. Here's the results: My link. Not my best work, but I was using an amateur lens and camera body (Rebel XSi and 55-250mm).

7) Lastly, remember you don't have much depth of field if you are shooting wide-open. I switched to just one-aiming point, and kept the light meter on evaluative. It helped a ton. Otherwise, the camera will "hunt" when your multiple aiming points run across ads on the boards, fans, etc. It also helps to aim at the players feet or at a spot that you know they will cross to take a picture. The low light will make it hard to get a good shot if they are moving in front of a changing background.

Rent a lens unless you own a great one all ready - you'll be glad you did. The faster the better. I like the 85mm prime lens, you should have plenty of focal length with it, and I hear that Nikon makes a good one in the similar range. A quick google search or a visit to the B&H store in Manhattan might give you better advice.

Have fun!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for all the advice, I really appreciate it! Your pictures look great by the way.

Can't speak for the Rock, but I travel a lot for business and have been to 5 NHL games in five different rinks this year with my Canon 7D and/or Rebel. I've never been stopped or had any problems. I just kept it in my hand with a short lens, then put the telephoto lens in my pocket. Nashville, Detroit, Dallas, Atlanta, and LA were the cities. Some suggestions (unsolicited, I know):

1) If you have short prime lens, like the Canon 50mm 1.8. I suggest having that on your camera when you walk in. It's a short lens, and not very professional "looking". You can also use it during warm ups to take shots in tight. Your best pictures will probably come from warm-ups. The players aren't moving as fast, and they go in predictable patterns - this will help you get set up easier.

2) Rent a lens. Lensrentals.com runs a GREAT service, and you can usually rent a lens for a week at a fair price. I own a 55-250, 15-85, 50mm, and 60mm prime. I've rented 100-400 for birds, air shows, etc. I've also rented some other lenses for weddings and sports. It's affordable, and might be the difference between gettign a great shot, and having just okay results. For -hockey, you don't need as much focal length as you do high ISO and/or fast lenses.

3) Get to the game early - if you can, try to be one of the first people in. If they thwart you, you'll have time to run to your car (or locker at the train station) and ditch the lens. If they don't you can get down to warm-ups and get some great shots pre-game.

4) If you are on the glass, you are going to want a short lens. I shot a ton of pictures in Nashville with my 50mm behind the net and they came out great.

5) Know your settings - practice before warm-ups to get a feel for the light. Don't waste your time on "P" or auto-mode. Start with ISO 800, and your widest aperture by setting your camera to "Av" mode. Take pictures of different places on the ice - look at your shutter speed. Anything less than 1/300th on a moving player is going to be just so-so. If you can hit 1/250 to 1/320th with ISO 800, keep it there. I set my camera to ISO 800, 1/250th, and F4.0 in Nashville and they were pretty good (not great). I only had my rebel, and ISO 1600 is not the best - on the other hand, if you have to, go to ISO 1600 before you go with slower shutter speeds.

6) If you have to shoot through the lexan (glass), get as close as you can. It will make your images "soft", but it won't necessarily ruin them. In Nashville, I had seats behind the net about 10 rows back, and I was able to shoot through the glass to the other side. Here's the results: My link. Not my best work, but I was using an amateur lens and camera body (Rebel XSi and 55-250mm).

7) Lastly, remember you don't have much depth of field if you are shooting wide-open. I switched to just one-aiming point, and kept the light meter on evaluative. It helped a ton. Otherwise, the camera will "hunt" when your multiple aiming points run across ads on the boards, fans, etc. It also helps to aim at the players feet or at a spot that you know they will cross to take a picture. The low light will make it hard to get a good shot if they are moving in front of a changing background.

Rent a lens unless you own a great one all ready - you'll be glad you did. The faster the better. I like the 85mm prime lens, you should have plenty of focal length with it, and I hear that Nikon makes a good one in the similar range. A quick google search or a visit to the B&H store in Manhattan might give you better advice.

Have fun!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for all the advice, I really appreciate it! Your pictures look great by the way.

Agreed, thanks for posting that. Definitely trying to get better at this, and that will help, lol.

Also, I might mention, especially as you said you couldn't speak for the Rock, but the lights are dimmed until the players hit the ice for warmups at the Rock, so the lighting's gonna be different from pre warmup to during warmup. Just thought I'd mention, this was how it was during my last visit in Jan(so sad, can't wait til Weds!), so things may have changed since then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.